Hoods Woods New Hoodlums Forum
What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Printable Version

+- Hoods Woods New Hoodlums Forum (http://forum.hoodswoods.net)
+-- Forum: Hoodlum Skills Forums (http://forum.hoodswoods.net/forumdisplay.php?fid=8)
+--- Forum: Questions and Answers (http://forum.hoodswoods.net/forumdisplay.php?fid=14)
+--- Thread: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? (/showthread.php?tid=49844)

Pages: 1 2


What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Jimbo - 06-16-2018

I ran a search and did not find anything which matched my query.  So if there has been a previous similar thread please advise and over look this one. 

What created the interest or desire to become a survivalist, prepper, or self-sufficient individual or family?


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Deerstalker - 06-17-2018

(06-16-2018, 11:41 PM)Jimbo Wrote: What created the interest or desire to become a survivalist, prepper, or self-sufficient individual or family?

My first memory of such thoughts is from the 60's - books, magazines, movies - my fathers stories of rabbit trapping & the depression.

Science fiction, experience working on farms,  vehicular  break downs, storms & time spent in native bush.

Mind you I'm not sure I neatly fit any of those categories above.

I have a trade background & have always had an interest in cutlery, firearms, hunting, shooting, the military & rural life.

Shy



 
,


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - ddennis2 - 06-17-2018

Curiosity


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Deerstalker - 06-17-2018

(06-17-2018, 10:45 AM)ddennis2 Wrote: Curiosity

Funny you should say that............it's the reason I get out of bed in the morning Tongue


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Benjamin Liu - 06-17-2018

I'd usually say it was Boy Scouts, but I actually had the beginnings of this mindset before I joined Cub Scouts or even heard of it, in fact that is why I wanted to join once I learned about Scouting.

Then I realized the artificially impose limits in Scouting put in by PC idiots.

Part of it is also logical thinking. If there will be a shortage of something, have more of it on hand. If there is a problem, have ways to deal with it.


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - TRYKER - 06-17-2018

i had no intension on learning to survive, my intension was to learn to thrive out there.


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Jimbo - 06-17-2018

Since I asked the question, I intended to begin with my own answer, but got sidetracked.

I grew-up in a very rural area, where everyone was poor, so no one really knew any difference.  My grandparents and parents had lived through the great depression years, and I heard plenty of the depression era stories growing up not only from parents, grandparents, but from family friends, extended family and even teachers at school.  Virtually everyone raised their own garden, many had various types of fruit trees, from which various fruits were harvested and traded or swapped with others having a differing type fruit orchard. Additionally, the wild berries, and fruits (dew berries, black berries, June berries, plumbs, wild grapes & muscadines, huckleberries, etc.) were picked, and used fresh in pastries, or pressure canned in glass jars fresh for later processing into baked goods or either used as the basis for jellies & jams then pressure canned to preserve the foodstuff. 

Most people planted fall gardens & many had nut trees (pecan, & walnut trees being the most common, and most knew where the wild hickory's grew which produced a good crop of nuts, even if they had no nut trees of their own).      

Fall ushered in the hunting season, and although subsistence hunting was not exactly practiced, wildlife did add meat to the table fare.  Two or three swine were normally picked out, pinned and fed until fattened, then all were butchered each fall.  The spring usually saw extra chicks being hatched and as they grew, the pullets were separated and introduced to the laying flock, whereas the roosters, which on the whole would soon become the main course for many Sunday dinners which followed.

Shopping at the grocery & markets in those days was pretty simple and quickly accomplished:  Coffee, tea, sugar, flour, salt, pepper & other spices, and for those who did not grind their own corn into cornmeal, cornmeal completed the list of items most people purchased back then.  Flower was typically packed in bags with floral designs which became dresses, shirts or blouses when the flower was emptied from the bag.  (It may have required more than one identical bag to make all of those items, but those flower sacks were not wasted.) 

Almost everyone had a smokehouse where much of their meat from both domestic and deer size game would be smoked.  Likewise everyone had a fireplace for warmth in the winter months.  Most still cooked on wood stoves, although a few were already converting to butane powered cook stoves, many years later that would transition propane, and maybe a quarter century later electric stoves would become an accepted cooking appliance in that area also.  Most people did have electricity, but only a single light bulb was had for illumination in most rooms.  A few may have had an outlet for a fan or radio, but rarely more than just a couple electrical outlets were available in the entire home.   

Many families did have a truck, since they provided much greater utility for transporting harvested goods, but many still traveled in wagons pulled by horses or mules.  Cars were strictly a luxury item and the few families having one were considered well off.  If they had an automobile in addition to a truck they were considered to be down right filthy rich.  

Women and girls sewed clothes for the family, knitted, tatted, crocheted and performed the majority of the other domestic duties like picking, processing, cooking & canning foods.  The boys harvested fire woods (and cook stove wood for those using wood cook stoves), did most of the plowing, feeding and tending to the domestic animals, although younger children of either gender were called upon to collect eggs, feed the chickens, dogs, cats and other moderate activities they could handle.  Most dogs and cats lived in a reasonably peaceful state of coexistence.  They were more than pets, since the cats were maintained for rodent & vermin control about the home, barn and other outbuildings.  Dogs were the early warning alarm system, in addition to providing hunting duties, of tracking, trailing & locating game animals, and occasionally providing that same service for locating domestic animals which managed to escape from their pastures or stables.   

So I guess, the bottom line answer is I grew-up in a home where self-reliance was a basic and guiding principal of living, where I was trained or condition to be self-reliant, since it was simply the way things were done.  Back then we didn't know, what being a 'Survivalist' or 'Prepper' meant, since these terms would be coined years later.  Neither were we dedicated to adhering to a self-reliant life style either, but that is what our life style actually consisted of.

I graduated high school, entered college and in my junior year met a girl with a similar background, although that had little influence on matters at that current time.  After marriage, then graduation, first was a teaching engagement for a couple of years, then I moved on to the land grant college where I worked in research.  From research, I transitioned across the isle to regulate that which I had been researching, and retired years later from that same department although I worked in three different offices during my career.

During those first few years we rented or leased housing and most of our eating came from manufactured sources.  I never gave up hunting or fishing, but it was more limited and considered sport hunting or fishing than what I was accustomed to growing up.  When I left research, we selected and purchased a location which gave us enough space for a small garden.  I purchased a tiller and went to work the following spring.  It was not easy, but we raised a few things and before the growing season had ended, I had already made up my mind to have something more than a hand held walking tiller to use in the garden.  Later that year, I purchased a 14 HP, Wheel Horse Lawn & Garden Tractor with a 12 inch turning plow, 36 inch tiller and 42 inch mowing deck.  In the years which followed, I added other implements to aid in gardening and outdoor grounds maintenance.  Working within the bounds of what that little Wheel Horse was designed to do, it has always performed most satisfactory and in some cases went above and beyond the call of duty.  I still have that original tractor, fully operational, but I got away from the main topic a little.  That WH became the ways & means of producing some excellent garden and vegetable crop over the years.  The wife has pressure canned, dehydrated and frozen surplus items from the garden.  We certainly purchase many more items from the grocery store than did our parents and grandparents, but we have no space for a milk cow for milk & butter, poultry for eggs & fresh chicken from the yard, nor the space to pen and fatten swine for butchering in the fall.  If we had the space, our neighbors would very likely most generously object. 

The children did not eat much commercially processed baby food when they were growing up, because the wife pureed food for them from the garden first, then when they would have graduated to junior foods she blended vegetables and fruits we had grown for them to eat when they were babies & toddlers.  The things they consumed were fresher and we certainly knew there were no pesticides or chemicals being used on the source of their foods, nor added to the finished product as a preservative and/or whatever other reasons they add various chemicals & dyes. 

The world has changed so much during our lifetime, it is difficult to revert to that way of life we knew when children ourselves, but we still strive to be self-sufficient as much as possible.  We use technology when it suits us and for its convenience, but we never rely on it.  We use solar power, and have all insulated windows in our home, to be as energy conserving as possible, but we also have a fireplace, kerosene heaters, and a wood stove and wood heater both in mothballs, so to speak, (storage) for just in case.  We maintain a well supplied food pantry, including those home processed foods which were canned, dehydrated or frozen. 

When the children were beginning to drive, a new leg of interstate highways was carved out of former woods just a short distance from where we live.  Being new it saw much less traffic then than today, so on Friday afternoons and/or Saturday morning the new driver and I would go to the new interstate highway and the new driver got to drive 75 - 100 miles getting off at ever exit and right back on the interstate highway.  When we turned around and headed home the same off & back on continued.  They drove other road also under supervision, but the interstate was the most preferred.  (Years later one of the daughters told me, she loved driving in the beginning, until I placed her on the interstate and made her constantly get off and back on the super highway, which she hated, but she wanted to learn how to drive so she could eventually drive without a coach, so she said nothing.  She continued, all she wanted to do was get on the road and drive, but now she said I understand the value of that driving experience.  The stopping, looking and then crossing a road without any control signals in addition to the getting off and then merging back into traffic on the big highway was really the best driving training I could have received, and I do fully understand its importance to a young beginning driver.)  Before they drove by them selves, they had to rotate the tires on one of our vehicles.  I figured by the time they had jacked, removed & installed a different tire four times, under supervision, they could perform the task alone, if necessary.  None liked that task, but years later when friends in college or at work with them, didn't have a clue about changing a flat tire, they were happy they knew how themselves. 

The girls may not be hunters, but they know how to use weapons and are not frightened at the sight of one, much less the mere mention of the words, gun, rifle, pistol, revolver, etc.  All the children had their own knives by their early teen years and they may not care to see their own blood, they are not squeamish at the sight of blood.  None are mechanics, but they know basic principles and have a pretty good working knowledge of all things mechanical.  We tried to teach them what was important and good common sense. 

Flooding, ice storms, tornadoes, nor any other natural disaster does not set us off into a frenzy, scrambling to the grocery store to stock up on everything we might need during the incident.  Power outages do concern us when they happen during the summer months, because of the potential to loose foods in freezers and refrigerators.  A few years back we purchased two small generators, one is large enough to handle the "surge" from three refrigerator or freezers starting at the same time, including lights and fans.  The smaller one will handle lights, fans, etc., but it is not capable of handling the surge from larger appliances like a freezer or refrigerator.  During the winter, there is little concern, unless the outage continues for days & days.  Being without the computer, TV, radio, phone, etc., is of little consequence for us.  To be honest, we are just as happy without them, and that is especially true for the phone, which is nothing more than a nuisance & annoyance today.  Even the cell phones are becoming instruments for much the same harassment, as the land lines are used for!   We may make a few purchases of perishable items like milk, bread & eggs for our own convenience, if we are running low, but we are not desperate to stock up on everything we might need for two weeks or more as most people will try to do now-a-days.   

During the past few years with the monsoon or drought conditions becoming more prevalent seasons here, gardening (farming) is becoming more of a gamble than ever, but we still try to raise as much of our vegetables as possible.  Being self-sufficient is and has been a way of life for us, although we have not always been as successful at being self-sufficient our entire life as we wished to be, that was still our goal. 

In closing, I guess we're like the old farmer who was asked, what would he do, if he won or inherited a million dollars?  He said, "I guess, I would just keep on farming until that was all gone too!"  We'll just continue working at being self-sufficient, until we're gone too!


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Deerstalker - 06-18-2018

I ended up here via Bill Quall, Bill Hay, Eric Stoskopf & their collective web sites. Shy


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Adapt-Overcome-Conquer - 06-18-2018

I ended up here by googling "survival"...

long story short--I had a foundation in extreme lightweight camping --in Algonquin Park's interior with my parents when I was a child....then life happened to me...then some 12 years later...after graduating university and trying to re-discover discover who I was and what I was interested in....I found that it was all things wild.

Survival TOTALLY cured me of depression, low self esteem and anxiety and taught me that I can achieve anything I want to. Basically its was what my dad had been saying all these years---suck it up buttercup. Big Grin

AOC


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - randyt - 06-19-2018

I grew up in a rural area where money was hard to come by. I still live in a rural area. Spent my youth hunting trapping and building things I wanted. My grandparents lived through the great depression as adults but had never heard of it, they were not well off money wise. I grew up on a small farm where much of our time was spent putting up for the winter. I don't know if it was survivalism or just wanting to be as self reliant as possible.


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - george of the J - 06-20-2018

I always had some interest in survival hardwired into me, I guess. But what really got me into learning about it was Woods Master Vol. 1.

It all started with the movie "Castaway." He had difficulty starting fire by friction. A month or two after that I watched an episode of season 2 "Survivor" where they failed to start fire with a bow drill. I wondered if I could do it, so I searched the web and found the Woods Master video on fire making.

The first video hooked me and I ordered, little-by-little, the rest of the Woods Master series.


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Tn Ridge Rover - 06-21-2018

It just kinda happened! When I was a kid, there was the family farms of both grandparents, which we spent a lot of time on the weekends with them. Then there were weekly visits each summer.

There was rabbit hunting with the family, fishing trips too.


Boy Scouts with Baker and Wall tents was fantastic as we were a camping troop.


A short marriage and quick divorce, brought on my quest to be a backpacker.  Colin Fletcher had his backpacking book out with all his equipment laid out on the front cover. That was my foundation. The Scouts were only car campers. I never had the chance to backpack with my "Yucca" pack.


American Survival Guide magazine kinda put everything together except for the primitive. There I saw Ron Hood and Christopher Nyerges, others too.


I always had a yearning to go more primitive, but could never put everything together, then...…..Y2K.


I went to the local library for computer access where I saw this forum and got some trapping stuff From "Buckshot."

Forgot to mention I had a shortwave receiver in 1999 where there were survival shows.  There I was exposed to Buckshot, Bo Gritz, Jack McLamb and others.    And we had a Y2K store in Nashville.  And a Y2k expo also, where I got to see my shortwave heroes in person!

There was something missing.

In 1999, I decided to get my primitive groove on! Backwoodsman mag had an ad for Ron's videos. He didn't have many out at that time. Well, Y2k passed and still no videos. A short few months into 2000, I started with the videos. I finally put everything together.

In 2005, I got my first computer and joined this forum!

 In 2006 I went to the Falling Leaves Rendezvous in North Georgia. There were folks there that had "real" TBJ type experiences growing up! From the Cherokee.


My dad died a few years ago and left me a few dollars, not much. I bought a good juicer, blender and a packraft. My packraft has opened up some different possibilities for me.  I  can't store my canoe or kayak under my bed!


January 2012, I had to move. I moved into a small apt close to work. I sold my kayaks. My old canoe is still in a barn on the family farm.


And can I say something else? Ron raved about the Busse knives. Perhaps 2003 or so. Mr Bussee had a booth at the local gun show  where he sold his big knives, but you had to order it. I got one, a Black Busse battle Mistress "E" model.


Currently I am crippled with mandatory overtime, so work out time is nonexistent and dirt or water time has taken a backburner for the moment. A water vacation in the fall is in my heart as I ponder the different trips I may take, dependent on weather and water conditions.

It just kinda happened! When I was a kid, there was the family farms of both grandparents, which we spent a lot of time on the weekends with them. Then there were weekly visits each summer.

There was rabbit hunting with the family, fishing trips too.


Boy Scouts with Baker and Wall tents was fantastic as we were a camping troop.


A short marriage and quick divorce, brought on my quest to be a backpacker.  Colin Fletcher had his backpacking book out with all his equipment laid out on the front cover. That was my foundation. The Scouts were only car campers. I never had the chance to backpack with my "Yucca" pack.


American Survival Guide magazine kinda put everything together except for the primitive. There I saw Ron Hood and Christopher Nyerges, others too.


I always had a yearning to go more primitive, but could never put everything together, then...…..Y2K.


I went to the local library for computer access where I saw this forum and got some trapping stuff From "Buckshot."

Forgot to mention I had a shortwave receiver in 1999 where there were survival shows.  There I was exposed to Buckshot, Bo Gritz, Jack McLamb and others.    And we had a Y2K store in Nashville.  And a Y2k expo also, where I got to see my shortwave heroes in person!

There was something missing.

In 1999, I decided to get my primitive groove on! Backwoodsman mag had an ad for Ron's videos. He didn't have many out at that time. Well, Y2k passed and still no videos. A short few months into 2000, I started with the videos. I finally put everything together.

In 2005, I got my first computer and joined this forum!

 In 2006 I went to the Falling Leaves Rendezvous in North Georgia. There were folks there that had "real" TBJ type experiences growing up! From the Cherokee.


My dad died a few years ago and left me a few dollars, not much. I bought a good juicer, blender and a packraft. My packraft has opened up some different possibilities for me.  I  can't store my canoe or kayak under my bed!


January 2012, I had to move. I moved into a small apt close to work. I sold my kayaks. My old canoe is still in a barn on the family farm.


And can I say something else? Ron raved about the Busse knives. Perhaps 2003 or so. Mr Bussee had a booth at the local gun show  where he sold his big knives, but you had to order it. I got one, a Black Busse battle Mistress "E" model.


Currently I am crippled with mandatory overtime, so work out time is nonexistent and dirt or water time has taken a backburner for the moment. A water vacation in the fall is in my heart as I ponder the different trips I may take, dependent on weather and water conditions.


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Joe Deer Runner - 06-27-2018

For me it was a sense of finding freedom, not having to rely on anyone else.


Joe


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - 7.62 - 07-07-2018

Because this world is a shithole full of messed up people.


RE: What Caused you to become a Survivalist? - Deerstalker - 07-08-2018

(07-07-2018, 08:46 PM)7.62 Wrote: ....... messed up people.

I think of it like mining, you have to deal with a lot of overburden to find diamonds Rolleyes