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How Effective Is A .22?
#16
Get some TI 25 mags Watcher from Tactical Innovations.



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if limited to a 22 get in terrain that "equals" the odds.
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#17
Having a .22 that you are familiar with puts you way ahead of a lot of folks. I can't add anything to the wisdom that has been discussed already, just chiming in that, IMHO, a .22 is a great hunting tool that can be pressed into service as a defensive weapon and a 10/22 is a great choice and fun to boot!
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#18
http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/index.php?...ntry449926



didn't see it mentioned but buying, shooting, and storing 22 is really easy. On a small budget. So is caching the ammo. so is it effective in that sense for most people! YES!!



CB longs, cb shorts, and super colibri as mentioned are quite quiet even out of a 18 inch barrel.



if it's really woodsy where you live, shorts are great if they group well enough to the range you will be shooting small game. For example, I pretty much only use cci cb shorts, shots to the neck for small game. Great thing about those is (they're quiet) you can carry double small game loadout by repacking a cci 100 cartridge plastic box- it will hold 200 shorts, not 100 long rifles.
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#19
[quote name='Watcher of the Woods' date='03 February 2011 - 04:40 PM' timestamp='1296780038' post='508882']

I need to find some place to go, closest range is 15 miles away and I don't wanna do that drive daily...



That link about lethality, wow... That really gave me a new appreciation for my gun.



[color="#0000FF"]I will be completely honest that I am a noob, and I don't know the least bit about where to start with practicing with my .22[/color]...[/quote]



We all started out that way....



Above the natural advice to get proper training, I also suggest:



1. In the absence of being able to live fire often, get some 22 Snap-Caps and dry fire practice at home.

(Be sure your instructior goes through how to do it safely.... This is a MUST!!)



2. Don't get in a hurry.

When first starting out, be sure that you are doing everything properly.... Slow cadence, being certain all is being correctly done

Your aim is to develope muscle memory habits... The proper ones....

Once learned, you go into "auto pilot" and do these things very rapidly if needed, so don't be concerned about learning by slow motion.



3. Don't shoot too long.

After a while as you slowly tire, you are prone on getting sloppy in your techniques..... NEVER practice poor techniques.

Do shoot often. But ALWAYS do it correctly.



4. Until you are sure that you have the proper techniques subconsciously fixed in your muscle memory, DO NOT go "Plinking"... (See #3 Above)



Once you are comfortable that your technique is properly learned, Plinking sessions shot from random ranges will really help get the feel of your 22 ballistics drop.



Survival perspective:



You are forced to use what you have on hand when the situation erupts.

If that is only a Ruger 10-22, then be aware of all its strengths and weaknesses....

There is a lot to be said of the Old West saying... "Beware of the man who only has one gun. He probably knows how to use it".

Be that guy... This will never be a usless quest no matter how many firearms you obtain in the future.

Lessons and habits learned on your 22 will transfer to other guns too.



Ammunition choices:



When I was younger, I started putting away a vast variety of 22 ammunition.

(The old, "Survivalist" seperate load for each species Mel Tappen thought pattern ... Bert from Tremmors comes to mind.... Fun mind games but practical???)

Then, sometime after I returned from my second tour in Vietnam, the thought that I had to resight in the rifle for optimum POA for some loads came up.

This is OK for normal conditions where you can easily replentish you supplies.

But that may not really be practical for a SHTF situation where wasting a limited, not replaceable amount of carried ammunition to resight might not be the best idea.

Then, of course, the thought of having the "wrong" ammunition in the gun when needed also surfaced.

(Yep, I know, carry several extra magazines with alternate ammo... Same POI?... Still need to resight in?... Will the target wait around for you? ......)



My solution was to pick a type of bullet for my 22 rifle that I considered the best all around choice, (for me the "Dimple Semi-Hollow Point") and find the one that my rifle liked the best.

After testing several different brands, I found a load that my rifle shot very accurately.... I then bought six cartons [color="#0000FF"]of the same lot number [/color]as the one I expiremented with.

I keep this in an ammo can with my rifle and BOB. I Never get into this for any reason...

(To be honest, I also keep a couple of boxes of CB caps in the ammo can too, in the rare chance, that I may need to be quiet and can't use a snare or other trap.)



The largest animal I've taken with a 22 and this ammunition was a Coyote angeling away shot behind the ear at about 40 yards. He went down like a lightning strike.

The dimple point has performed very well on the rabbits and squirrles I've shot with it too.



Tactical Use of the 22:



There have been several tests where 22s have been shot at unrealistic ranges and have shown unexpected penetration.

But, the first rule of a gunfight is "Don't Be There".

Why engage a target at 300 yards instead of escape and evade? You are hard to see at extended range, why bring attention to yourself and your exact location?

Naturally, Having the knowledge of your gun's extended range capabilities and amount of ballistic drop, is a desireable thing....

But, it's not a good defensive tactic for such a limited firearm unless absolutely called for.

(That being said, it is fun to plink at Coffee cans at extended range set on a sandy slope so you can "walk" the bullet impacts on target from random ranges... Just not overly practical)



Self defense:



As Zen and others have mentioned, bullet placement is everything.

A 22 will surely kill an adversary.... But how much damage can he do to you or a loved one before he expires?

Know where to hit a perp to put him down instantly with what little energy you are using.



The usual instant drop target is the centeral nervous system.

This is formed in a "T" shape formed by the eyes across and the spinal cord down.

Any hit there will put a human target down instantly.

Now, can you hit that under exreme pressure? ... From what range? ... From what angle?

(A gun fight is NOT a Politically Correct contest... There are no rules other than get in the first effective hit or die)



As in all things, different people have had diffeent experiences and have different opinions.

That is a healthy thing.... Listen to all ideas, and form your own opinions based on other's ideas and your own experience.



Good Luck,



Steve
Mr. C



FOR THOSE WHO HAVE FOUGHT FOR IT

FREEDOM HAS A FLAVOR

THE PROTECTED WILL NEVER KNOW
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#20
Wow! Thank you all so much for your responces, this has been very enlightening! Now I'm dying for spring to get here!



I'm thinking I'll try to buy 4-5 differant types of ammo and see which one runs best through my gun.



This is really exciting to be honest <img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Smile' /> lol
The Hoodlum formarly known as Survivor Kid 909



Carpe Diem, Seize the Day!



Nature will not speak until man is quiet. ~Me
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#21
A word of caution on the 'Colibres' made by Aguila. The box says for handgun use only. With that being said I have never had one fail to exit the barrel on either on my .22 lr rifles. Please make sure they exit the barrel before sending another one down range.
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#22
[quote name='Stitch' date='04 February 2011 - 05:59 PM' timestamp='1296860394' post='509040']

A word of caution on the 'Colibres' made by Aguila. The box says for handgun use only. With that being said I have never had one fail to exit the barrel on either on my .22 lr rifles. Please make sure they exit the barrel before sending another one down range.

[/quote]



+1 on what Stitch said... I us them, and have no problems, but be careful!



Back to the topic. IMHO a .22 is the best weapon to have (if I could have only one...)! In some situations it will not suffice, but in 99% of them, it will do fine. As a defensive weapon, many rounds can be put on target quickly. It will at least make 'em think twice.



Granted, in a perfect world, a BMG 50 cal. would be great... <img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/whistling.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':whistling:' />



Pix
So. Indiana, Metro Louisville area...



"Hope for the best... prepare for the worse"



In other words, "Pray to GOD... But row for shore!"



http://www.dougpixley.com
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#23
I've probably told the story here before, but during 6 years as an animal control officer in the provincial capital, I was the guy who had to shoot injured deer, sometimes 3 a night. We were issued a .22 magnum, but due to proximity to houses, and because of its strange, non-gunlike appearance, I carried my M6 Scout (people assumed it was some sort of tranq gun most of the time). The Scout, coupled with either CCI Stingers or Velocitors, killed scores of deer very effectively. While many shots were at contact range, most were not. The longest shot I made would have been in the 35 yard range, and the .22 had no problem penetrating and exiting the skull. On a couple of occasions, I shot deer with the CCI CB Long, which also penetrated the skull effectively at contact range.



Like Zen says, the shot has to be placed properly, but if it is, the .22 will do the job very effectively. If you anticipate having to shoot animals with the .22, I highly recommend becoming very familiar with where each specific animal's brain is and how to landmark it from external clues at various angles.
Don't be intimidated by the colossal challenge of saving the world; there are as many worlds as there are people. Save yours, the one made up of the life you share with the ones around you. Where one flower blooms, a million more will follow.



Non serviam.
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#24
N'3,



Thanks for what you "had" to do...



Like you said, the M-6 does not fit the description of a gun, ( to some people...).



A .22 placed right will take care of many creatures, learn your weapon, and make the shot count!



Pix
So. Indiana, Metro Louisville area...



"Hope for the best... prepare for the worse"



In other words, "Pray to GOD... But row for shore!"



http://www.dougpixley.com
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#25
[quote name='number3' date='05 February 2011 - 11:57 AM' timestamp='1296871031' post='509070']

I highly recommend becoming very familiar with where each specific animal's brain is and how to landmark it from external clues at various angles.

[/quote]



+1!!!



Not all the head is brain



It obviously doesn't matter so much with small game, but as they get bigger it does.



I keep a few animal skulls recovered from the bush to illustrate just that point.



I've seen plenty of animals with head shots that were not instantly fatal.



Although, none I can remember escaped, they were all sufficiently disoriented to allow a follow up.



Elephants are an extreme example, big brain but huge head full of all sorts of stuff other than brain.





And not all brain shots result in instantaneous death.



e.g. the recent shooting in Arizona of Gabrielle Giffords.



http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_congresswoman_shot



I'm also aware of several unsuccessful human suicide attempts where the bullet passed through some part of the head but not the brain



One guy in particular that lives nearby put a .303 round through the roof of his mouth & had it emerge though his eye socket, he's not happy but he's still alive





On another thread relevant subject



I personally only use one load per rifle



It's different with shotguns, although even then once I decide on a trap load for example I buy in bulk & don’t swap & change



Once I find a load that shoots well in a particular rifle, even a rimfire I stick with it through thick & thin



Typically I buy rimfire ammo 5000 at a time



Rifle shooting for me is about reducing the variables





Watcher,



I seem to remember you live in a rural region, if so, what about approaching rural property owner for permission to shoot on their land?
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#26
Lots of good advice given already, some clarification needed in places.

Your 10/22 is designed to function and fire only .22 Long Rifles. If you use Shorts, Longs or the "Colibri" rounds be aware you'll have to function the action manually and load them single shot, they won't function through the magazine. Also be sure to check the barrel after each "Colibri" shot to be sure the bullet left the barrel.

As for practice, lots of practice is very good, more is better. BUT only IF you are practicing doing things correctly. Practicing doing things wrong just builds bad habits that have to be broken later before you can learn to do it right. You say you're a newbie, noting wrong with that, we all either are or were at some time. It's important to get competent instruction in how to shoot, operate and maintain your rifle, then you'll know what to practice. Practice can be done on your own, but it takes an instructor to watch you shoot and make corrections to get you on the right foot to start with. Ask around the local gun stores and check the yellow pages and online to find a competent instructor to get you started right.
Think direction first, then velocity.

“Let your gun accompany you on your walks, the heft will do you well and it will ward off evildoers.” Thomas Jefferson
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#27
I've seen a .22 SHP to the forehead drop a 200+ lb. hog in it's tracks. I've heard of a woman in a fight or die situation killing a bear with a .22. Your local Fish and Game officer usually knows the best instructors and often is an instructor.
Those on the far right would call me a liberal tree hugger, I'm worst than a tree hugger, I'm a tree planter. Those on the far left would call me a gun waving conservative, I never wave my gun, I keep it steady on target.



If we don't watch out for each other, who will watch out for us?
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#28
Can't add much... One thing you could do if you play with some of the powderless rounds is to set up a chrono to confirm the bullet has left the barrel. That beats having to run a rod or visually check the barrel.



A .22 LR is basically a lower powered .223 remington. The bullet weight of the typically used 22 lr is less than the typically used 223, say 36 gr to 55 gr for example. The heaviest .22 lr I've shot is probably the 60 grain subsonics, where as with the 223 I've loaded some 40 grain V-max.



Velocity is where the major difference between the two calibers come into play. Obviously the 223 has significantly more powder behind it. The average for 223 is probably around 2800-3100 fps, the .22 lr around 1500, give or take depending on bullet weight and charge.



Energy delivered to, lets say 50 yards with a 35 grain bullet at 1330, for the .22 lr is around 140 ft-lbs. The same bullet weight behind the 223 at 2850 fps is 630 ft-lbs. Yes, the difference is quite significant but like everyone else has said, shot placement is the key.



My go to rifle is my AR15, in .223/5.56. With the .22 lr conversion kit it has opened many doors for me, such as the ability to take small game, lower noise, along with the capability of taking larger game is necessary. I've played with the numbers, I've played with downloads to get those 223 loads in the .22 lr speeds, using Trail Boss, which were successful. All in all I'm satisfied with the .22 caliber, it is more capable then most people want to admit. Sure larger calibers allow less skilled shooters to take large game, but when the SHTF those larger calibers will limit the amount of rounds that can be carried. Consider why the military went with the .223 over the 30-06 or 308, there is a significant weight savings... that same savings will count in a survival situation.



If all I had was a 10/22, I would be damned good with that rifle... because its fun to shoot, cheap to shoot and they are great little rifles. And I would be satisfied knowing I could hit a dime with that rifle, which would be necessary to take small game or large game. You should be a marksman regardless of what game you are hunting... And being able to shoot 500 rounds for $25... there is no reason not to be a marksman. Study your game, know where its vitals are, listen to others recommendations of where to shoot it, and a .22 LR is really all anybody needs. Aim small, miss small...
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#29
RogerSP,



Well said! <img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbsup:' />



I do not have a .22 conversion for my AR, but I know there is an advantage to having one



I am 100% behind a .22... IMHO, you cannot go wrong!



Pix <img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Big Grin' />
So. Indiana, Metro Louisville area...



"Hope for the best... prepare for the worse"



In other words, "Pray to GOD... But row for shore!"



http://www.dougpixley.com
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#30
I highly recommend one of the Henry lever actions. They allow fast shooting if necessary, a fairly decent magazine capacity (12 .22 LR), and it will feed any .22 (.22 long, long rifle, CB, shorts, etc.) without trouble, even if they're mixed in the magazine. I have the Youth model due to it's shorter barrel (16"), and it is a very accurate, handy rifle. If faced with the mythical and unrealistic "One Gun" scenario, my Henry would be the one.
Don't be intimidated by the colossal challenge of saving the world; there are as many worlds as there are people. Save yours, the one made up of the life you share with the ones around you. Where one flower blooms, a million more will follow.



Non serviam.
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