Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Look Out For These Cans.
#1
Heinz mini cans are small to carry, and light, and just enough to accompany something else at the campfire.

Just lift the ring pull slightly to open the can, and place in the embers.

The can heats nicely, and then hold with paper to remove the lid.

Eat from the can.

There are many varieties.

Beans and pork sausages make an ideal breakfast with toast and butter.

Curried beans are also another favourite of mine.


Attached Files
.jpg   minimeals.jpg (Size: 209.92 KB / Downloads: 16)
.jpg   DSCF0446-749570.JPG (Size: 145.56 KB / Downloads: 16)
"You can't hit the ball unless you take a swing."
Martin Crane

"As God once said - and I think rightly . . ."
Field Marshal Viscount Montgomery

“Steady Monty. you cant speak to me like that. I'm you boss."
Dwight D. Eisenhower


"Remember gentlemen it is not just France we are fighting for, it's champagne."
Churchill 




Reply
#2
What about the plastic lining? <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/ermm.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':ermm:' />
Reply
#3
No, there is no plastic lining deerstalker - well not in the UK. By the way a British soldier says he uses them while out soldering.
"You can't hit the ball unless you take a swing."
Martin Crane

"As God once said - and I think rightly . . ."
Field Marshal Viscount Montgomery

“Steady Monty. you cant speak to me like that. I'm you boss."
Dwight D. Eisenhower


"Remember gentlemen it is not just France we are fighting for, it's champagne."
Churchill 




Reply
#4
Crapola......some of the cans I've been cooking the food in had a plastic liner...I guess that is bad? I mean I know it is, but I've never thought about it before. I'll stop doing that <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/blink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':blink:' />
"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."--Thomas Jefferson

"Buy land- they are not making it anymore"- Mark Twain

"An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile €”hoping it will eat him last." -Winston Churchill

"Wilderness is in our hearts first and always. All of us can't have a cabin in the mountains. It's the wilderness within we must strive for first."- R. Sullivan
Reply
#5
[quote name='adapt-overcome-conquer' timestamp='1411055555' post='594687']

Crapola......some of the cans I've been cooking the food in had a plastic liner...I guess that is bad? I mean I know it is, but I've never thought about it before. I'll stop doing that [Image: blink.gif]

[/quote]



The plastic liner is probably just BPA. Everyone has their own views about that. People have been heating stuff in cans for years. Not ideal but............







Sure wish we had some curried beans on this side of the pond! Curried Beanine Weenies might be a treat! Better than potted meat and Saltines!
Message of Insight and Unity 

We go into the wilderness to fulfill our hearts and empty our minds of life's garbage.
The gear we leave behind and the challenges we encounter, 
Are methods we use to cleanse our spirits.
Of Survivalists and Bushcrafters, Primitive Technologists too, we are one.........

It is the wilderness within, we strive for first and always.
Not everyone can have a cabin in the mountains.
The thread that connects us, is fine like silk and strong as steel.
Together, the song of the wilderness is the song we sing!

"And can I say something else?"
Bushcrafting is "doing what you want to do." 
Survival is "doing what you have to do"
Primitive Technology is about all of the above........

By TNRR aka "Survival Sully"
Reply
#6
Even soda cans have a very thin lining that is an electrical insulator... not sure if a type of plastic.
{  "Trust in Jesus but carry a sixgun in the bathroom."€  Phantom  }
Reply
#7
If you're boiling the food on your campfire, it's never going to get hotter than the boiling point of water. The cans were processed at much higher temps when they were sealed and pressure cooked at the factory.



Which is to say that if you're worried about polymer linings, you need to avoid cans altogether... and even glass jars have mold release agents on them.
Men are, that they might have joy.
Reply
#8
[quote name='thatmckenzie' timestamp='1411083667' post='594702']

If you're boiling the food on your campfire, it's never going to get hotter than the boiling point of water.[/quote]



While this may be true for water, unfortunately it's not the case for canned food. Anyone who's ever scorched food in a can where he or she has experienced localized burning can tell you that the localized temperature got much hotter than boiling. Theoretically if you constantly stirred the food you could avoid this, but in the real world that doesn't work in a can. Number one, the can is always tall and narrow, with sharp-radius corners that make mixing towards the bottom impossible. Number two, the can is always nearly 100 percent full from the factory, so any stirring sloshes out the contents. And number three, since there's no handle on the can, it's hard to stabilize it and keep it steady while stirring.



So much for being a buzzkill. Now for the good news: There is a safe/proper/easy way to do it.



A double boiler.



Just get a can or metal container slightly larger in diameter than your food can. Cut the top off, throw a little gravel (a few quarter-inch stones) in the bottom, and dump in some water. Now put your food can (either opened or--even better--just with a steam-vent hole punched into it, or with the lid only slightly opened) into this "pot," and chuck the whole thing into your campfire. No stirring, no hassle, no melted plastic. Heating your food in a double-boiler takes a little longer, but if there's one thing we usually have plenty of in the mountains it's time. Go work on your shelter, pinch a loaf, lay in some more firewood--you get the picture. You can use the technique to that anything to about 212 degreed F (100 degrees C).



The water in the "big" pot will never get hotter than local boiling temp, and that will transfer the heat (gently, and safely) to the smaller, inner, food-filled can. Kill enough time and your food will heat through without stirring. Why the gravel? To ensure a layer of boiling water underneath the can as well as on the sides.



I can't tell you how many hundreds of cans of chow I ate like this. For a while, I thought this was lesson number two about how to set up your bachelor apartment. I'm sure Limey Pete has used the trick a thousand times, but the microwave generation may have forgotten it.



With Ron we'd cook up a steak wrapped in foil and a pre-trip can of corn in a campfire while we checked out the student sites. At another time in my life I'd find a reason to chat up a tank or LAV-25 crew and set the rig up on the exhaust or the turbocharger housing along with a pot of coffee. Either way I got some hot grub in my belly without having to worry about cancer of the bunghole in later life. And when you've got an asshole as big as mine, that's a real worry.



On that happy note . . .



Thanks for the tip on the food, LP. Cheers!



--ML



[size="1"]Grand Master King Dickhead Maximum Rat Bastard Slack-Jawed Leftist

White-Collar Godless Liberal California Sheeple Lumpenproletariat

Jesuit Illuminati Samizdat Intelligentsia Cultural Elite Long-Haired Gun-Hippie Desert Roach

Nine-Fingered Mouth-Breathing Mud-Running Motorcycle-Riding Alpha Über Geek

Yuppie Asshole Lazzaroni Neandertal Ragpicking Spaβbremse and Cross-Country Ski Jerk©®™

[/size]
Reply
#9
Of course!!!



And the old shall become new again....



Thanks, ML...

Reply
#10
[quote name='Limey Pete' timestamp='1411048958' post='594681']



Just lift the ring pull slightly to open the can, and place in the embers.



[/quote]





[quote name='thatmckenzie' timestamp='1411083667' post='594702']



If you're boiling the food on your campfire, it's never going to get hotter than the boiling point of water.



[/quote]



I had the impression Pete wasn’t using water. <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/unsure.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':unsure:' />



I’m sure he has a viable system that works for him though. <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink3.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':wink3:' /> <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbsup:' />
Reply
#11
No I am not using water, and I have not been poisoned yet.

I had the impression that the food in cans is sterilized while in the can by heating the can anyway.

I have not seen plastic liners on the cans I have used, but maybe some of the other varieties have them - I do not know.

I hope I have not given out bad information on this. I am just recommending in regard to my own experiences.

And, I do boil water in empty soda and beer cans all the time, but of course they do not have plastic liners.
"You can't hit the ball unless you take a swing."
Martin Crane

"As God once said - and I think rightly . . ."
Field Marshal Viscount Montgomery

“Steady Monty. you cant speak to me like that. I'm you boss."
Dwight D. Eisenhower


"Remember gentlemen it is not just France we are fighting for, it's champagne."
Churchill 




Reply
#12
[quote name='--ML' timestamp='1411087961' post='594706']



A double boiler.



--ML



[/quote]



<img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbsup:' />



That was just about the first cooking technique I can remember my Mum passing on.



I had a cousin though who mistakenly popped a sealed can in hot oil someone else had on the stove, rather than water.



The ensuing explosion & burns meant there was a trip to casualty that night. <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/stretcher.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Confusedtretcher:' />
Reply
#13
[quote name='--ML' timestamp='1411087961' post='594706']



So much for being a buzzkill. Now for the good news: There is a safe/proper/easy way to do it.



A double boiler.



Just get a can or metal container slightly larger in diameter than your food can. Cut the top off, throw a little gravel (a few quarter-inch stones) in the bottom, and dump in some water. Now put your food can (either opened or--even better--just with a steam-vent hole punched into it, or with the lid only slightly opened) into this "pot," and chuck the whole thing into your campfire. No stirring, no hassle, no melted plastic. Heating your food in a double-boiler takes a little longer, but if there's one thing we usually have plenty of in the mountains it's time. Go work on your shelter, pinch a loaf, lay in some more firewood--you get the picture. You can use the technique to that anything to about 212 degreed F (100 degrees C).



The water in the "big" pot will never get hotter than local boiling temp, and that will transfer the heat (gently, and safely) to the smaller, inner, food-filled can. Kill enough time and your food will heat through without stirring. Why the gravel? To ensure a layer of boiling water underneath the can as well as on the sides.





On that happy note . . .



Thanks for the tip on the food, LP. Cheers!



--ML



[size="1"]Grand Master King Dickhead Maximum Rat Bastard Slack-Jawed Leftist

White-Collar Godless Liberal California Sheeple Lumpenproletariat

Jesuit Illuminati Samizdat Intelligentsia Cultural Elite Long-Haired Gun-Hippie Desert Roach

Nine-Fingered Mouth-Breathing Mud-Running Motorcycle-Riding Alpha Über Geek

Yuppie Asshole Lazzaroni Neandertal Ragpicking Spaβbremse and Cross-Country Ski Jerk©®™

[/size]

[/quote]





I knew we could count on you for an informative yet highly entertaining answer --ML you really are the "Grand Master" of facts...I knew about double boiling- that is how I gently melt my beeswax but this is an excellent idea- the can never gets hot enough for the BPA to leech into the food...and we can all be healthy, happy and bunghole cancer free <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':lol:' />



AOC
"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."--Thomas Jefferson

"Buy land- they are not making it anymore"- Mark Twain

"An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile €”hoping it will eat him last." -Winston Churchill

"Wilderness is in our hearts first and always. All of us can't have a cabin in the mountains. It's the wilderness within we must strive for first."- R. Sullivan
Reply
#14
I have just read that the sealed can is heated anyway to 240° F (116° C).

If contaminants from the can could leach into the food this would not be done.

I accept the temperature of fire would be much higher, however the principle of food in cans not being contaminated by heating the can, might be established.

And so I am prepared to risk the part of my anatomy that ML refereed to, by heating food in cans on a campfire. <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/blink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':blink:' /> <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Smile' />



This is what I read:



"The sealed cans are then sterilized; i.e., they are heated at temperatures high enough and for a long enough time to destroy all microorganisms (bacteria, molds, yeasts) that might still be present in the food contents. The heating is done in high-pressure steam kettles, or cookers, usually using temperatures around 240° F (116° C). The cans are then cooled in cold water or air, after which they are labeled."
"You can't hit the ball unless you take a swing."
Martin Crane

"As God once said - and I think rightly . . ."
Field Marshal Viscount Montgomery

“Steady Monty. you cant speak to me like that. I'm you boss."
Dwight D. Eisenhower


"Remember gentlemen it is not just France we are fighting for, it's champagne."
Churchill 




Reply
#15
[quote name='--ML' timestamp='1411087961' post='594706']

While this may be true for water, unfortunately it's not the case for canned food. Anyone who's ever scorched food in a can where he or she has experienced localized burning can tell you that the localized temperature got much hotter than boiling.

[/quote]



It may have, indeed, gotten much hotter... but it didn't do that until all the water in that location had turned to steam and flashed away. It's the identical mechanism that lets a person walk on hot coals or get by with only a warning when you lay your calf on a hot exhaust pipe.



I'm not trying to be pedantic, I'm trying to keep people using their noggins. We're all scientifically-inclined souls, we Hoodlums, else we'd not be so dedicated to trying new things and being willing to fail at them so we can improve.



The plastic lining in the can (or the mold release agent on a glass jar) has already leached whatever it was going to leach when the can was heated in the autoclave to pasteurize the contents. Those temperatures were at least 10% hotter than boiling water.



As for what might leach out... it's pretty clear cut to be a nonissue. For the BPA thing that most people seem to be concerned about based on media coverage, you'd have to drink gallons of boiling water to see any effect. (And it'd have to still be boiling when you drank it because that stuff isn't very soluble.)



I know you're the king dickhead, ML, but some of us with smaller dicks have heads, too. I hate to see people losing theirs over something pretty silly. <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbsup:' />
Men are, that they might have joy.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)