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Electrical Transfer Switch For The Furnace
#1
Hello good people

I am considering getting a electrical transfer switch to allow me to power the electronics of the natural gas furnace, using my little gasoline powered generator to supply the 110 VAC. I put a current clamp meter on the heater circuit, it only draws a little over 3 amps. These transfer switches are mounted outside the house and connect to the main Circuit breaker box inside. I have seen some online for one circuit/heater only for about 100 bucks, although I am thinking to get a 4 circuit model, so I can power the frig and freezer during the warm months. Beside the comfort of a heated house, freezing and bursting the water pipes are a big concern. I live in Minnesota where it can and does get extremely cold.

So I was wondering if anyone has done this, what are your experiences, costs, ect.

Thanks all

Bill
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#2
I recently had an electrician friend install a new breaker panel with a transfer switch. I think he called it a interlock.

It is simply a metal plate that blocks the main and exposes another breaker that is connected to the power tap mounted outside. {the main must be off for the plate to move} This supplies 30 amps @220 volts and feeds all circuits..



This prevents a "backfeed" to the utility supply which could injure someone working on the main line.



I still need a larger generator to power this as my small [2000 watt 110volt] wont produce 220 power.



Prior to this I made do with the small gen. by rewiring my furnace from direct to the panel to a regular outlet. using an old drill cord.



Using this method I was able to run a heavy 100 ft. cord that I alternated between the furnace, freezer, refrigerator and a battery charger that charged my boat battery which powered the computer or TV off a small inverter for short times.



Disclaimer: follow all codes and have a licensed Electrician perform the work.







This link explains it better than me.



[url="http://www.interlockkit.com/ilkitworks1.htm"]http://www.interlock...ilkitworks1.htm[/url]
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#3
I've been thinking of doing this, and have a smaller generator for the 5th wheel, (3000 watt), and am

thinking of getting a larger one for the house......



this is the way to go....I've actually rigged them up without a "Lockout" but it's not Kosher....



excellent info, thanks much for the link
Skip



"Life's Tough.....it's Tougher if you're Stupid".....John Wayne.
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#4
[quote name='Bill' timestamp='1384306146' post='584141']

Hello good people

I am considering getting a electrical transfer switch to allow me to power the electronics of the natural gas furnace, using my little gasoline powered generator to supply the 110 VAC. I put a current clamp meter on the heater circuit, it only draws a little over 3 amps. These transfer switches are mounted outside the house and connect to the main Circuit breaker box inside. I have seen some online for one circuit/heater only for about 100 bucks, although I am thinking to get a 4 circuit model, so I can power the frig and freezer during the warm months. Beside the comfort of a heated house, freezing and bursting the water pipes are a big concern. I live in Minnesota where it can and does get extremely cold.

So I was wondering if anyone has done this, what are your experiences, costs, ect.

Thanks all

Bill

[/quote]





i have used a couple fo these they are easy to install take a couple of hours, read the installation instructions on the site, if you can attach two wires together with a wire nut you are pretty much good to go.



http://www.gen-tran.com/eshop/10Expand.a...ode=30310V



alex
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#5
how to install a transfer switch :



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZG4XlFNVZg



alex
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#6
I wired in a Reliance Controls TRC1006D Panel/Link Generator Transfer Switch (for Up to 15,000-Watt Generators, 12-Circuit 100 Amp Utility/60 Amp) as a sub panel in our last house. It fed some of the lights, furnace, fridge and a few of the plug-in’s for computer etc. We had a 8K Generac outside, but didn't want the auto switchover. The well was on a separate shop meter and could manually be run from another generator/welder. With a 125 gal in-line pressure tank in the basement and a 12 volt pump we would only have to run the well pump for 15 minutes every other day. Tried it out pre Y2K for a week, no problem.



Where we are at now I simply have a pigtail hooked to a back-feed 30 amp double pole breaker and can manually shut of the main breaker and any unwanted circuits I don’t need. It is not code kosher <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/pirate.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':pirate:' />/> but costs less than $30 and can be used in any panel with the same breaker type (QO). The twist lock pigtail fits most 3500 watt + generators. I do not leave it installed but have it just in case. <img src='http://hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/whistling.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':whistling:' />
"Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all." -Helen Keller
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#7
If I might make a suggestion.

Make sure that any setup you make is easy enough and KISS (Keep it simple stupid) Because the other members of your family may be the ones who have to switch it over. You may not be there in a real emergency. Remember they may have to do it by themselves with nothing but a flashlight to see by.

And some of the those setups will screw things up if not switched over correctly.
Remember, Noah was the ORIGINAL prepper.



Paranoids are just people that know all the facts - Warren Ellis
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