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Are You Ready?
#16
Well...SHTF in a way yesterday, we got thru it ok.



As far as the primary question ...we would do ok, but I am not as organized as i would like to be.That said, we have come a long way this year ( Sig Other has come to realize that this stuff is a good idea)



With weapons we are OK...nor quite as orgaized as i'd like, but we'd do ok. Not as much ammo as i'd like But I'd say that if I had a billion rounds

Food...ok for a while, then we eat horses. I'm serious.



H20-good to go. Stream out back. I shoudl get a Big Berkly filter, now that I think of it.



Have house, camp.acres. Liberals to eat.
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#17
Before I would eat my horses, there would not be anything else to eat within one hundred miles. I'm serious.





Muleskinner,
He who hesitates is lost.



If you are not living on the edge, you are taking up too much space.



Lead, follow, or get the hell out of the way.



You can lead a fool to talk, but you can't make him think.



Sometimes I wake up grumpy, and sometimes I let her sleep.



There are damm few problems that can't be fixed, with a long handled shovel and a thirty ought six.
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#18
Sorta stuck where we are in a med sz. city north of S.F. To much invested time to bag my job. I know I am playing the odds but I do hope to retire in 8 years.

We have plenty of stuff to last us 3-6 months with most of the normal extras people talk about. Money to last a couple months if needed.

We don't store much water because I count the water heater and we have several lakes,creeks nearby. I have about every type waterfilter made. Stoves and camp fuel are not an issue. I also keep 2 cases of MRE's for grab and go with a 2 6pks of bottled water. Backpackiing gear is at hand so I don't worry to much about being able to get quick if needed.

Money is not a real issue IMO becasue we are both in a demand service occupation, to keep us happy and on the job during an emergency I am hoping they will continue to pay us to stay. AND that is the real issue.

As the song goes " Do we stay or should we Go" ? that is the real question and when. Then what to we take and what do we leave behind.

We are lucky in having a relative in a rural area but they are still 750 mi away.

I have gas 5 gas containers (5gal. ea ) I only feel safe keeping 2 full the plan is to fill the other 3 if I see stuff happening.that might be wishful thinking so I also have a siphon hose. The plan if needed would be to drain the wifes car then hope to find more on the way.

I can make the drive with a full tank and 15 more.At the worst I would need to scrounge 30 gal.

We have a concern with our pets so I bought supplies for them.

Our dog's have about 30 days of normal food on hand, birds about

60 days. Our dog's are easy keepers and can eat anything. Wild seed for the parrots in an emergency so a wal-mart sack could last forever, I don't think we will have a run on wild seed unless things get Real-Real bad.

Tools and shelter are not a big issue, if needed we could live in the garden shelter, toilets we could do like Ron and fill bags.

Our greatest likely danger is with earthquakes other "problems" and all bets are off.

IMO as long as we can stay near home we will do fine in most cases.

Even having to take a short camping trip ( long as everyone was) of a week or two is not a big problem.

What bothers me is a possible need to leave the area for an extend time, i.e. over a month. Likely that would be a perment life changing event and likely caused By a perment life changing event.

If it looked like life might return to normal in a week or month we would stay, if it looked like life would never be the same again

then we would consider leaving.
"Pain Heals, Glory Lasts Forever" ( Falco )



There are 10 kinds of people in the world.

1. Those who understand binary,

2. And those who don't.
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#19
I live in an apartment. So space is at a premium for stored supplies. I have been creative by utilizing spaces such as under the couch. (Remove the liner and plenty of open area underneath.)

I don't plan on staying bugged in for too long as who knows if the building will even be hospitable or habitable. I can't control my neighbors who live in the same building. Example would be electrics out so they use candles and set the building on fire.

I've been meaning to set my new truck up for a BOV ever since I bought it. Rons post here has reminded me to get off my ass and do it. I just can't believe that I will be able to remain in this building if something bad comes down the road.

I am looking for some land to buy so that I will have a destination other than State Parks or similar. That's a little harder order to fill. Gotta start somewhere right?



Thanks Ron.
"A Nation of Sheep will beget a government of wolves." Edward R. Murrow

"Bring me a GREEN one, I'll scrub the patchoulli off her!" Ghostwolf.
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#20
No Sweat Brumbie.



You're got far too many skills to be lost in any upheaval. Do what'cha need to do to keep yourself and family alive to the other side. Spending a couple of weeks with you in Romania has given me a deep respect for your abilities. I have complete confidence in your innovation and speed on your feet. No matter what, folks will always underestimate you. Take advantage of that.



Take photos of that BOG box yer gonna make too.



Ron
Hind sight is an exact science until historians or politicians get involved.



Nothing is so simple that it can't be misunderstood.



I have regular bowel movements, I just wish they were voluntary...



My dad started walking five miles a day when he was 60. Now he's 91, and we don't know where he is.



Understand?
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#21
I must admit that three weeks ago i thought i was good to go. Now i have had to rethink my position. The good news is that my mini and maxi kits are complete, as is the ghb,and im working on the vehicle stuff. food is a work in progress and ive been doing a little catching up..buying the high protein stuff first. Our house has a very large propane tank..so large we havent moved the needle in over a year..so that is something im working on utilizing in the future..guns and ammo..good to go..25oo rounds each semi auto rifle and 1000 per handgun and at leat a billion for the .22 s (or so my wife says)i owe Ron and Karen and the lot of you guys on this forum a big Thank you for giving me the proverbial kick in the pants to get going..
 " Survival is not mandatory" Norseman DT 08

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#22
[quote name='Mako_tree' post='87974' date='Sep 23 2006, 03:16 AM']That's trouble for me, I'm currently traveling and visiting friends and looking for a place of residence. Anyone wanna save up for one extra?[/quote]

<img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Tongue' />



No problem!!

It has always been my way to prepare for my family plus two people. I live by the motto "prepare to serve, not just survive."

If everyone did this, there would be a great deal less stress in the survival community.

This does NOT mean that I tell others what I am doing about preparations or what I have on hand, but I am ready to help distressed family and friends in time of need.

And I, too need to keep on keepin' on with my preps.

Never enough time or money to be where I want to be.



Good thread!! <img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbsup:' />



GW
Grey Wolf



Just because I'm paranoid does not mean they are not out to get me.
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#23
I have noticed on most of these post that people usually only have food and water enough for 3 to 5 months at the most. But what happens after that. Even in New Orleans they where still struggling 5 months later. What happens in the long term SHTF scenario?
"The sun has not risen on the day that I will face death graciously. I will kick, and claw, and bite, and scratch, and spit my last breath in it's face. Never give up!"



"Beware the beast man, for he is the Devil's pawn. Alone among God's primates, he kills for sport or lust or greed.

Yea, he will murder his brother to possess his brother's land. Let him not breed in great numbers, for he will make a desert of his home and yours.

Shun him; drive him back into his jungle lair, for he is the harbinger of death."
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#24
I really feel bad about my situation, even though I have some essentials. I just moved to the country from a city townhouse, you have no idea how good this makes me feel! Its a roommate thing, but I'm on 5 acres, with a good pond, well water and near family. Most of my stuff is stored with family, but I could make a good go of things where I am. And everyone around here has the same last name as me! I guess we were related in Ireland!
Message of Insight and Unity 

We go into the wilderness to fulfill our hearts and empty our minds of life's garbage.
The gear we leave behind and the challenges we encounter, 
Are methods we use to cleanse our spirits.
Of Survivalists and Bushcrafters, Primitive Technologists too, we are one.........

It is the wilderness within, we strive for first and always.
Not everyone can have a cabin in the mountains.
The thread that connects us, is fine like silk and strong as steel.
Together, the song of the wilderness is the song we sing!

"And can I say something else?"
Bushcrafting is "doing what you want to do." 
Survival is "doing what you have to do"
Primitive Technology is about all of the above........

By TNRR aka "Survival Sully"
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#25
Quote:No problem!!

It has always been my way to prepare for my family plus two people. I live by the motto "prepare to serve, not just survive."

If everyone did this, there would be a great deal less stress in the survival community.

This does NOT mean that I tell others what I am doing about preparations or what I have on hand, but I am ready to help distressed family and friends in time of need.



It's good to see this type of attitude <img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Wink' />



As for me, I'll feel a lot better after buying the traps and trapping video, and will admit I am NOT ready.



Dave
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#26
I am unfortunately an apartment dweller. The upside is that my apartment is about 200 yards from the shore of lake Michigan, which offers a lot in the way of food supply and transportation possibilities. Being a fairly clean freshwater lake, I am not wary about filtering the water from the lake for consumption purposes.



I don't have months and months worth of supplies like some of the folks in here do, but that really isn't of much concern to me. About once a week I make a trip to the local sporting goods stores to pick up some Mountain House freeze dried meals. I've found them to be a bit like eating hamburger helper, which to me is acceptable when I'm out in the field. They run about $5 per meal for the 16oz yeild Pro-Pak veriety, which have the added benefit of being vacuum sealed. Prior to hydration they only weigh around 4 oz a piece, so carrying a few days worth of food is not a big problem.



I recently picked up a jetboil (http://www.jetboil.com) and I have to tell you, I'm absolutely in love with it. 2 cups of water boil in 2 minutes, using a propane/butane mix fuel. The jetboil was around $70, and the fuel cans are about $4 for the ones that fit inside the jetboil. One can is good for around 12 litres of water, and I have used mine frequently for about 2 weeks and not yet run one can out. I keep some of the freeze dried meals in my office at work, and the jetboil lives in my laptop/bugout bag, along with a full set off Brunton titanium silverwear. I recently picked up their titanium spork as well, so I can typically equip myself and one other person with just my own personal gear.



My laptop / BOB is a Camelbak BFM. It's got a 3 litre resevoir, and holds 2550 cubic inches of gear. It's also got MOLLE attachment loops all over it, so securing additional gear is pretty easy. It's internal frame, and waaaay more comfy to wear than that damnable ALICE pack Uncle Same issued me when I was in the army.



I keep a Katadyn Hiker water purifier in one of the side pockets, as well as some basic minikit stuff. I also horde those koolaide singles in the very front pocket.



I've got an entire spool of 550 cord at the house, and usually keep 100' or so in my backpack, which I never leave home without.



I am hoping to buy a house this coming summer, and intend on getting a GMC sonoma style small 4x4 pickup this winter. I also want to get my hands on either a canoe with sail riggings, or a pair of sea kayaks. In a SHTF situation, I fully expect the big Mackinaw bridge to be gridlocked, but since the straits are only 5 miles wide, I feel confident that I could make the trip across in a sufficiently stable canoe or kayak. I live about 30 miles south of the big mac, so it wouldn't take me long to get there at all. My destination will be the Hiawatha national forest, which is 880,000 acres of deep woods and swamp. Being as I've lived in Northern Michigan all of my life, I've got a lot of confidence in my abilities in the terrain here.



I only have one gun right now, but it's a damn reliable and rugged Remington 710 in .300 winchester magnum. I try to buy a box of rounds per paycheck, and only buy the winchester supreme ammo, even though its almost $40 for 20 rounds. I plan on getting a reloader in the near future so that I can load some under powered rounds for shooting small game with. I like the idea of having one of those M6's with the 4/10-22's but I'd rather just have one barell to worry about keeping clean. The 710 is a simplified version of the venerable remington 700's, containing far less parts, making it easier to maintain. I think I read that there's only 22 parts in it total. All I know is that I've got sub moa accuracy out of it, and it came with a workable scope for less than $400 out the door at the local walmart. The only downside (if you call it that) is that the bolt is a tight fit, so people use to more prim and polished weapons will find it's use to be a bit rough, I personally like that aspect of it.
Welcome to the internet, you're probably taking it too seriously.

What you see is the result of the perspective you choose.

"Knowledge isn't wisdom unless it's empirical." - My own damn self.

Grand Rapids Michigan
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#27
[quote name='hunter301' post='88573' date='Sep 27 2006, 05:12 AM']I have noticed on most of these post that people usually only have food and water enough for 3 to 5 months at the most. But what happens after that. Even in New Orleans they where still struggling 5 months later. What happens in the long term SHTF scenario?[/quote]



That's a good question...but think about it...can anyone absolutely prepare indefinitely? When our country was more agrarian, people were able to produce what they needed, now that we are more urban, that option just isn't open to many of us.



The thought about preparations is to get through the "situation", be it storm, earthquake, civil unrest, bomb, etc, have adequate materials and supplies on hand to properly take care of yourself and possibly others and then re-assess. Once the immediate emergency has passed, the logistics system may re-open, negating the need for a years worth of supplies...then again it may not......the local situation may require you to move, Katrina immediately comes to mind,.....how would you move all of that stashed material? Would your stash even make it through the immediate problem? None of us is immune to being impacted.



In a long-winded way, I am trying to say, assess those disasters that are likely to impact you, say earthqake in my case, and plan accordingly. Plan smartly and realize that bugging out may not be desireable or an option, just as staying in place may not be an option either. Ya just got to assess and make new decisions. Events and situations change and require constant modification of your decisions.



Dave
Some mornings it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps!


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#28
The only events I'm ready for are earthquakes and wildfires, that's here in SOCAL. For the really serious EOTW issues I hope to have permanently moved to my other home in WA before that happens; it will happen, it's just a matter of time. In WA I've got room to store lots of stuff and I already know my neighbors are good people. Here I don't really know the neighbors other than to say hi and wave. Do not want to be trapped in SOCAL when serious shit starts happening.
"Gold is the money of kings; silver is the money of gentlemen; barter is the money of peasants; but debt is the money of slaves."

Money and Wealth in the New Millennium, by Norm Franz.
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#29
[quote name='dravine' post='88584' date='Sep 27 2006, 05:11 AM']I only have one gun right now, but it's a damn reliable and rugged Remington 710 in .300 winchester magnum. I try to buy a box of rounds per paycheck, and only buy the winchester supreme ammo, even though its almost $40 for 20 rounds. I plan on getting a reloader in the near future so that I can load some under powered rounds for shooting small game with. I like the idea of having one of those M6's with the 4/10-22's but I'd rather just have one barell to worry about keeping clean. The 710 is a simplified version of the venerable remington 700's, containing far less parts, making it easier to maintain. I think I read that there's only 22 parts in it total. All I know is that I've got sub moa accuracy out of it, and it came with a workable scope for less than $400 out the door at the local walmart. The only downside (if you call it that) is that the bolt is a tight fit, so people use to more prim and polished weapons will find it's use to be a bit rough, I personally like that aspect of it.[/quote]



For the .300 win. mag. try using .223 sabot rounds reloaded into your .300 cases. I have a remington 700 custom tack driver chambered for .300 Weatherby Magnum. It was one of the few batches that where made by Remington before Weatherby took them to court and had them cease production of any firearms that chamber a custom Weatherby round. It is all stainless and the barrel is fully flutted on a McMillan custom stock with pivot bipod stand w/ telescoping legs. I have a high power 6x20 50mm scope mounted on it. The guy I bought it from did all his own reloading and he used to reload some of his .300 cases with a .223 sabot. This baby comes out of the barrel at 5400 fps. Now that's moving. The weapon is a tack driving sniper rifle. Hardly any drop. And the sabbot casings do not promote wear on the barrel over time.

The guy who owned it used to practice shooting the heads off matches at 300 yards.

Sadly enough though in a quick bugout situation this would probably not end up coming with me. The gun is way to bulky and heavy to move around with.
"The sun has not risen on the day that I will face death graciously. I will kick, and claw, and bite, and scratch, and spit my last breath in it's face. Never give up!"



"Beware the beast man, for he is the Devil's pawn. Alone among God's primates, he kills for sport or lust or greed.

Yea, he will murder his brother to possess his brother's land. Let him not breed in great numbers, for he will make a desert of his home and yours.

Shun him; drive him back into his jungle lair, for he is the harbinger of death."
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#30
[quote name='Luvfal' post='88108' date='Sep 23 2006, 06:55 PM']Liberals to eat.[/quote]



Eat me? I hardly even know you! <img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt='Tongue' />



I currently only have enough supplies for about a month without relying on foraging, trapping, hunting, fishing, barter (or conservative's horses <img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink3.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':wink3:' /> ). But I'm a city dweller, and suspect I'd have other ( <img src='http://www.hoodswoods.net/IVB/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/2guns.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':2guns:' /> ) problems long before food and water became a real issue. I'm mostly concerned with surviving natural disasters, anyway. It's not that I don't believe in possible man-made SHTF scenarios, just that the most realistic risk assessment I've been able to come up with says that the likelihood of any given long-term attack/social breakdown happening in my area in my lifetime is really probably pretty small compared to the possibility of a natural disaster happening in my area in my lifetime. So I've prepared for the most likely threat, with an eye towards generic solutions that are highly adaptable.



I was caught in a 7.0 quake in the Seattle area a few years back and things got pretty well disrupted for a short time. (Interestingly, it happened the day after we had some minor rioting that ended in a murder.) That's what finally got me serious about getting us prepared for real. It also taught me another valuable lesson, too, though: all the stockpiling in the world won't help you if you aren't home when disaster strikes, and can't get home! In the case of natural disasters (or bombs, for that matter), there's also no guaranty that your home will survive. That's one of the major problems highlighted by the fates of people in New Orleans who couldn't or wouldn't evacuate - a basement full of supplies won't help much when the water reaches the roof. Similarly, if "The Big One" the experts keep warning us is going to eventually hit the Pacific Northwest actually hits in my lifetime, I want to be prepared; but I'm not counting on my house making it through. It's a good house, a decent location - but there's just no way to predict such a thing.



So I've made what I think are reasonably good precautions to occupy my home for a while without resorting to government help - a month with relative ease, longer using various expanded survival skills - but my main concentration has been on making sure that we have really good car kits, and the proper skills and training to improvise wherever we may be. In my experience, being mentally prepared to focus and take the appropriate action in an emergency is the ultimate key to survival.
To know me is to love me. Luckily, I am inscrutable.
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