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what Revolver (s ) do you conceal carry?
#16
(09-18-2018, 11:19 PM)Deerstalker Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 06:47 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote: Its like there is so much I want to do and SO little time and money for it! 

That's universal AOC, but as Curly said...........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2k1uOqRb0HU

You are right, for me personally, the one thing is and always will be archery and related equipment, just the satisfaction of building it myself using hand tools mostly, has been incomparable. 

But I am starting to get bit by the fire arm bug...so much I need to learn! I have some gigantic gun digest books here given to me by a hoodlum... good place to start I reckon, along with the forum.

(09-19-2018, 03:26 AM)muleskinner Wrote: All of the above is good information. I have over one thousand rounds of .44 mag brass, that has been in nearly constant use since the 1980's, when it shows signs of splitting I throw it away. In my Redhawk I have split brass clear down to the rim, with no damage to the gun. All I have ever used for powder is Unique, and I know how it acts.

. Those light weight toy Smith's simply won't hold up. Oh, hell did I just say that out loud?

Big Grin Big Grin  say what out loud? (oh groan** is this some kind of Ford vs Chevy but in a gun thing?)

Also forgive my ignorance but is this "showing signs of splitting" thing easy for me to spot, like is it just creases, lines, cracks ect? or like what JB said--about it stretching and stuff? Good to know you've been using them since the 80's!

Great info here! ok we promise to only use your recipe, with your preferred specs exactly!

AOC
"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."--Thomas Jefferson

"Buy land- they are not making it anymore"- Mark Twain

"An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile €”hoping it will eat him last." -Winston Churchill

"Wilderness is in our hearts first and always. All of us can't have a cabin in the mountains. It's the wilderness within we must strive for first."- R. Sullivan
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#17
Mine is a Ruger Sp101,3 in 357.Strong side /hip.I use my own loads.Mostly 125gr JHP. and mix of 158 gr semi wadcutters loaded midway to hot.
a armed man is his own master
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#18
(09-20-2018, 10:23 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 11:19 PM)Deerstalker Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 06:47 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote: Its like there is so much I want to do and SO little time and money for it! 

That's universal AOC, but as Curly said...........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2k1uOqRb0HU

You are right, for me personally, the one thing is and always will be archery and related equipment, just the satisfaction of building it myself using hand tools mostly, has been incomparable. 

But I am starting to get bit by the fire arm bug...so much I need to learn! I have some gigantic gun digest books here given to me by a hoodlum... good place to start I reckon, along with the forum.

(09-19-2018, 03:26 AM)muleskinner Wrote: All of the above is good information. I have over one thousand rounds of .44 mag brass, that has been in nearly constant use since the 1980's, when it shows signs of splitting I throw it away. In my Redhawk I have split brass clear down to the rim, with no damage to the gun. All I have ever used for powder is Unique, and I know how it acts.

. Those light weight toy Smith's simply won't hold up. Oh, hell did I just say that out loud?

Big Grin Big Grin  say what out loud? (oh groan** is this some kind of Ford vs Chevy but in a gun thing?)

Also forgive my ignorance but is this "showing signs of splitting" thing easy for me to spot, like is it just creases, lines, cracks ect? or like what JB said--about it stretching and stuff? Good to know you've been using them since the 80's!

Great info here! ok we promise to only use your recipe, with your preferred specs exactly!

AOC

As the bullet leaves the cartridge pressures are created. That is what pushes the bullet down the rifled barrel. The chamber and barrel of your weapon are made, preferably, from specific, hardened alloy steel designed to withstand these forces and pressures. even then there are tolerances specified in reloading charts and recommendations from cartridge makers and weapon producers for each specific caliber to achieve desired results. Back to our cartridge case. The cartridge case is preferably brass,or nickel, some from aluminum or other concoction. All these cases are made from softer metal so the case expands and allows the bullet, which is seated and crimped to hold it in place, to escape from the casing. As all this takes place The end of the case stretches and as it stretches the walls thin. This stretching and thinning occurs in all cases but more so in higher pressured calibers. A responsible reloader will check his/her brass after cleaning to ensure length and trim as needed, according to recommended tolerance, so that the case fits the cylinder properly. This will allow the casing to eject properly without fouling the chamber. It is important to also check the casings for cracks as pressure will seek to escape where there is lease resistance. These can usually be seen with the naked eye.  "Hot" loading increases the chances in all of this. Brass cases are preferred over nickel cases as the nickel can scar the cylinder wall preventing smooth ejection of the casing. I have seen the top strap of one pistol, not a Ruger or a S&W, actually begin to buckle from hot loading. I have seen stretched loads not fit the cylinder from being too long. It is important that the neck of the case be thick and long enough to allow the bullet to be seated at the proper depth but now we are getting into the actual reloading. Another chapter. If you reload , purchase good brass  or quality ammo.
Addictive knife buying isn't guided by logic.

Its probably my age that makes people think I am an adult.

Tolerance is within a standard.

"Food is power. We use it to change behavior. Some
may call that bribery. We do not apologize."
 -Catherine Bertini, UN World Food Ex. Director, 1997

Proverbs 27:17
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#19
(09-20-2018, 10:23 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 11:19 PM)Deerstalker Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 06:47 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote: Its like there is so much I want to do and SO little time and money for it! 

That's universal AOC, but as Curly said...........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2k1uOqRb0HU

You are right, for me personally, the one thing is and always will be archery and related equipment, just the satisfaction of building it myself using hand tools mostly, has been incomparable. 

But I am starting to get bit by the fire arm bug...so much I need to learn! I have some gigantic gun digest books here given to me by a hoodlum... good place to start I reckon, along with the forum.

(09-19-2018, 03:26 AM)muleskinner Wrote: All of the above is good information. I have over one thousand rounds of .44 mag brass, that has been in nearly constant use since the 1980's, when it shows signs of splitting I throw it away. In my Redhawk I have split brass clear down to the rim, with no damage to the gun. All I have ever used for powder is Unique, and I know how it acts.

. Those light weight toy Smith's simply won't hold up. Oh, hell did I just say that out loud?

Big Grin Big Grin  say what out loud? (oh groan** is this some kind of Ford vs Chevy but in a gun thing?)

Also forgive my ignorance but is this "showing signs of splitting" thing easy for me to spot, like is it just creases, lines, cracks ect? or like what JB said--about it stretching and stuff? Good to know you've been using them since the 80's!

Great info here! ok we promise to only use your recipe, with your preferred specs exactly!

AOC

When you handle the brass in the reloading process, always be on the look out for small cracks. Check before you resize the brass. The resizing often will close the crack and make it harder to see.
He who hesitates is lost.



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Lead, follow, or get the hell out of the way.



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#20
(09-21-2018, 06:31 PM)muleskinner Wrote: When you handle the brass in the reloading process, always be on the look out for small cracks. Check before you resize the brass. The resizing often will close the crack and make it harder to see.

Smile  now that is some advice I can take to the bank!

Thanks, I will keep my eyes peeled for small cracks!

Christine
"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."--Thomas Jefferson

"Buy land- they are not making it anymore"- Mark Twain

"An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile €”hoping it will eat him last." -Winston Churchill

"Wilderness is in our hearts first and always. All of us can't have a cabin in the mountains. It's the wilderness within we must strive for first."- R. Sullivan
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#21
AOC, If you have not already purchased your reloading tools, I strongly recommend you purchase reloading die sets with a Tungsten Carbide sizer die, which is often abbreviated as T/C sizer die.  The T/C dies require no lubrication on the cases before resizing the brass and increases the speed of the reloading by eliminating the lubing the cases and cleaning the lube from the cases, a process I personally find dirty & time consuming.

The T/C dies are more expensive initially, but the time they save you over a lifetime will more than make up for that initial investment. 

Unfortunately the T/C dies are only available for straight and/or tapered handgun cases, so rifle brass must be lubed, with the exception of when only neck sizing rifle brass.  I use powered graphite when neck sizing rifle brass, which eliminates any clean up, although I do routinely wipe the necks of brass sized using the powdered graphite. 

Get yourself a good reloading manual and follow the directions, being vigilant for any thing not normal.  I have several reloading manuals and do consult some of the others from time to time, but basically keep going back to the same 'ol manual I started with many years ago.
Jimbo
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