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what Revolver (s ) do you conceal carry?
#16
(09-18-2018, 11:19 PM)Deerstalker Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 06:47 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote: Its like there is so much I want to do and SO little time and money for it! 

That's universal AOC, but as Curly said...........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2k1uOqRb0HU

You are right, for me personally, the one thing is and always will be archery and related equipment, just the satisfaction of building it myself using hand tools mostly, has been incomparable. 

But I am starting to get bit by the fire arm bug...so much I need to learn! I have some gigantic gun digest books here given to me by a hoodlum... good place to start I reckon, along with the forum.

(09-19-2018, 03:26 AM)muleskinner Wrote: All of the above is good information. I have over one thousand rounds of .44 mag brass, that has been in nearly constant use since the 1980's, when it shows signs of splitting I throw it away. In my Redhawk I have split brass clear down to the rim, with no damage to the gun. All I have ever used for powder is Unique, and I know how it acts.

. Those light weight toy Smith's simply won't hold up. Oh, hell did I just say that out loud?

Big Grin Big Grin  say what out loud? (oh groan** is this some kind of Ford vs Chevy but in a gun thing?)

Also forgive my ignorance but is this "showing signs of splitting" thing easy for me to spot, like is it just creases, lines, cracks ect? or like what JB said--about it stretching and stuff? Good to know you've been using them since the 80's!

Great info here! ok we promise to only use your recipe, with your preferred specs exactly!

AOC
"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."--Thomas Jefferson

"Buy land- they are not making it anymore"- Mark Twain

"An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile €”hoping it will eat him last." -Winston Churchill

"Wilderness is in our hearts first and always. All of us can't have a cabin in the mountains. It's the wilderness within we must strive for first."- R. Sullivan
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#17
Mine is a Ruger Sp101,3 in 357.Strong side /hip.I use my own loads.Mostly 125gr JHP. and mix of 158 gr semi wadcutters loaded midway to hot.
a armed man is his own master
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#18
(09-20-2018, 10:23 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 11:19 PM)Deerstalker Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 06:47 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote: Its like there is so much I want to do and SO little time and money for it! 

That's universal AOC, but as Curly said...........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2k1uOqRb0HU

You are right, for me personally, the one thing is and always will be archery and related equipment, just the satisfaction of building it myself using hand tools mostly, has been incomparable. 

But I am starting to get bit by the fire arm bug...so much I need to learn! I have some gigantic gun digest books here given to me by a hoodlum... good place to start I reckon, along with the forum.

(09-19-2018, 03:26 AM)muleskinner Wrote: All of the above is good information. I have over one thousand rounds of .44 mag brass, that has been in nearly constant use since the 1980's, when it shows signs of splitting I throw it away. In my Redhawk I have split brass clear down to the rim, with no damage to the gun. All I have ever used for powder is Unique, and I know how it acts.

. Those light weight toy Smith's simply won't hold up. Oh, hell did I just say that out loud?

Big Grin Big Grin  say what out loud? (oh groan** is this some kind of Ford vs Chevy but in a gun thing?)

Also forgive my ignorance but is this "showing signs of splitting" thing easy for me to spot, like is it just creases, lines, cracks ect? or like what JB said--about it stretching and stuff? Good to know you've been using them since the 80's!

Great info here! ok we promise to only use your recipe, with your preferred specs exactly!

AOC

As the bullet leaves the cartridge pressures are created. That is what pushes the bullet down the rifled barrel. The chamber and barrel of your weapon are made, preferably, from specific, hardened alloy steel designed to withstand these forces and pressures. even then there are tolerances specified in reloading charts and recommendations from cartridge makers and weapon producers for each specific caliber to achieve desired results. Back to our cartridge case. The cartridge case is preferably brass,or nickel, some from aluminum or other concoction. All these cases are made from softer metal so the case expands and allows the bullet, which is seated and crimped to hold it in place, to escape from the casing. As all this takes place The end of the case stretches and as it stretches the walls thin. This stretching and thinning occurs in all cases but more so in higher pressured calibers. A responsible reloader will check his/her brass after cleaning to ensure length and trim as needed, according to recommended tolerance, so that the case fits the cylinder properly. This will allow the casing to eject properly without fouling the chamber. It is important to also check the casings for cracks as pressure will seek to escape where there is lease resistance. These can usually be seen with the naked eye.  "Hot" loading increases the chances in all of this. Brass cases are preferred over nickel cases as the nickel can scar the cylinder wall preventing smooth ejection of the casing. I have seen the top strap of one pistol, not a Ruger or a S&W, actually begin to buckle from hot loading. I have seen stretched loads not fit the cylinder from being too long. It is important that the neck of the case be thick and long enough to allow the bullet to be seated at the proper depth but now we are getting into the actual reloading. Another chapter. If you reload , purchase good brass  or quality ammo.
Addictive knife buying isn't guided by logic.

Its probably my age that makes people think I am an adult.

Tolerance is within a standard.

"Food is power. We use it to change behavior. Some
may call that bribery. We do not apologize."
 -Catherine Bertini, UN World Food Ex. Director, 1997

Proverbs 27:17
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#19
(09-20-2018, 10:23 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 11:19 PM)Deerstalker Wrote:
(09-18-2018, 06:47 PM)Adapt-Overcome-Conquer Wrote: Its like there is so much I want to do and SO little time and money for it! 

That's universal AOC, but as Curly said...........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2k1uOqRb0HU

You are right, for me personally, the one thing is and always will be archery and related equipment, just the satisfaction of building it myself using hand tools mostly, has been incomparable. 

But I am starting to get bit by the fire arm bug...so much I need to learn! I have some gigantic gun digest books here given to me by a hoodlum... good place to start I reckon, along with the forum.

(09-19-2018, 03:26 AM)muleskinner Wrote: All of the above is good information. I have over one thousand rounds of .44 mag brass, that has been in nearly constant use since the 1980's, when it shows signs of splitting I throw it away. In my Redhawk I have split brass clear down to the rim, with no damage to the gun. All I have ever used for powder is Unique, and I know how it acts.

. Those light weight toy Smith's simply won't hold up. Oh, hell did I just say that out loud?

Big Grin Big Grin  say what out loud? (oh groan** is this some kind of Ford vs Chevy but in a gun thing?)

Also forgive my ignorance but is this "showing signs of splitting" thing easy for me to spot, like is it just creases, lines, cracks ect? or like what JB said--about it stretching and stuff? Good to know you've been using them since the 80's!

Great info here! ok we promise to only use your recipe, with your preferred specs exactly!

AOC

When you handle the brass in the reloading process, always be on the look out for small cracks. Check before you resize the brass. The resizing often will close the crack and make it harder to see.
He who hesitates is lost.



If you are not living on the edge, you are taking up too much space.



Lead, follow, or get the hell out of the way.



You can lead a fool to talk, but you can't make him think.



Sometimes I wake up grumpy, and sometimes I let her sleep.



There are damm few problems that can't be fixed, with a long handled shovel and a thirty ought six.
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#20
(09-21-2018, 06:31 PM)muleskinner Wrote: When you handle the brass in the reloading process, always be on the look out for small cracks. Check before you resize the brass. The resizing often will close the crack and make it harder to see.

Smile  now that is some advice I can take to the bank!

Thanks, I will keep my eyes peeled for small cracks!

Christine
"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."--Thomas Jefferson

"Buy land- they are not making it anymore"- Mark Twain

"An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile €”hoping it will eat him last." -Winston Churchill

"Wilderness is in our hearts first and always. All of us can't have a cabin in the mountains. It's the wilderness within we must strive for first."- R. Sullivan
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#21
AOC, If you have not already purchased your reloading tools, I strongly recommend you purchase reloading die sets with a Tungsten Carbide sizer die, which is often abbreviated as T/C sizer die.  The T/C dies require no lubrication on the cases before resizing the brass and increases the speed of the reloading by eliminating the lubing the cases and cleaning the lube from the cases, a process I personally find dirty & time consuming.

The T/C dies are more expensive initially, but the time they save you over a lifetime will more than make up for that initial investment. 

Unfortunately the T/C dies are only available for straight and/or tapered handgun cases, so rifle brass must be lubed, with the exception of when only neck sizing rifle brass.  I use powered graphite when neck sizing rifle brass, which eliminates any clean up, although I do routinely wipe the necks of brass sized using the powdered graphite. 

Get yourself a good reloading manual and follow the directions, being vigilant for any thing not normal.  I have several reloading manuals and do consult some of the others from time to time, but basically keep going back to the same 'ol manual I started with many years ago.
Jimbo
If everything is a case for gun control, then nothing is. - Charles C. W. Cooke

Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. - Theodore Roosevelt 1907 
Every immigrant who comes here should be required within five years to learn English or leave the country.  - Theodore Roosevelt 1918

The two most common elements in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity. - Harlan Ellison

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I am not sure about the former. - Albert Einstein
I fear the day that technology surpass our human interaction.  The world will have a generation of idiots. - Albert Einstein

The optomist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears that this is true! - James B. Cabell
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#22
(09-21-2018, 01:11 PM)jbarrow Wrote: As the bullet leaves the cartridge pressures are created. That is what pushes the bullet down the rifled barrel. The chamber and barrel of your weapon are made, preferably, from specific, hardened alloy steel designed to withstand these forces and pressures. even then there are tolerances specified in reloading charts and recommendations from cartridge makers and weapon producers for each specific caliber to achieve desired results. Back to our cartridge case. The cartridge case is preferably brass,or nickel, some from aluminum or other concoction......... This will allow the casing to eject properly without fouling the chamber. It is important to also check the casings for cracks as pressure will seek to escape where there is lease resistance. These can usually be seen with the naked eye.  "Hot" loading increases the chances in all of this. Brass cases are preferred over nickel cases as the nickel can scar the cylinder wall preventing smooth ejection of the casing. I have seen the top strap of one pistol, not a Ruger or a S&W, actually begin to buckle from hot loading. I have seen stretched loads not fit the cylinder from being too long. It is important that the neck of the case be thick and long enough to allow the bullet to be seated at the proper depth but now we are getting into the actual reloading. Another chapter. If you reload , purchase good brass  or quality ammo.

Thanks for that great info Jim, I have actually experienced (i think) something similar to that casing not being ejected properly with Joes old .22 and then (from a different cause) with my buddys shot gun....

crapola....half of what I have bought, fired and saved are brass but I suspect the other half might be nickel, as they are aluminum colored and shiny...and I remember Joe saying something when he opened the box like "dammit---these ones cant be reloaded...."

I am looking at the boxes now but cannot find anything saying what they are...

around here in Ottawa (almost 1 million population) there is 1 store selling ammo-- Cabellas---and they only carry 3 boxes of .44 mag ammo at any one time and they are Remington- 70$ for a box of 50 rounds. 240 grain.

As soon as I get my reloading manual, dies, primers ect....I'll make a post about it...


AOC
"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."--Thomas Jefferson

"Buy land- they are not making it anymore"- Mark Twain

"An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile €”hoping it will eat him last." -Winston Churchill

"Wilderness is in our hearts first and always. All of us can't have a cabin in the mountains. It's the wilderness within we must strive for first."- R. Sullivan
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#23
(09-22-2018, 01:43 AM)Jimbo Wrote: AOC, If you have not already purchased your reloading tools, I strongly recommend you purchase reloading die sets with a Tungsten Carbide sizer die, which is often abbreviated as T/C sizer die.  The T/C dies require no lubrication on the cases before resizing the brass and increases the speed of the reloading by eliminating the lubing the cases and cleaning the lube from the cases, a process I personally find dirty & time consuming.

The T/C dies are more expensive initially, but the time they save you over a lifetime will more than make up for that initial investment. 

Unfortunately the T/C dies are only available for straight and/or tapered handgun cases, so rifle brass must be lubed, with the exception of when only neck sizing rifle brass.  I use powered graphite when neck sizing rifle brass, which eliminates any clean up, although I do routinely wipe the necks of brass sized using the powdered graphite. 

Get yourself a good reloading manual and follow the directions, being vigilant for any thing not normal.  I have several reloading manuals and do consult some of the others from time to time, but basically keep going back to the same 'ol manual I started with many years ago.

Ok Jimbo you are right, I have looked into it and seems they are reasonably priced here--within the 75 to 100$ range when the other (non T/C) are about 40$ so although the T/C dies abit more expensive, it does seem worth it! Especially since I plan to do a shit load of re loading!

I have been instructed by my mentors to get a good reloading manual and start reading...they say the limits are all laid out in the charts...so I will do so and if I havent gotten around to it by x mas, maybe santa (hahah my mom) will have a nice manual for me under the tree.

AOC
"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny."--Thomas Jefferson

"Buy land- they are not making it anymore"- Mark Twain

"An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile €”hoping it will eat him last." -Winston Churchill

"Wilderness is in our hearts first and always. All of us can't have a cabin in the mountains. It's the wilderness within we must strive for first."- R. Sullivan
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#24
Nickel cases are more durable than brass and are excellent, and they typically cost extra.  Aluminum cases in the U.S., and I assume they are the same world wide, are Berdan primed having two small flash holes in the case, rather than a single larger flash hole as does Boxer primed cases.  Berdan primed cases can be reloaded if brass or nickel, although they are a pain to de-prime.  It is not recommended that Aluminum cases be used for reloading, and that is basically the reason for their being Berdan primed.  Aluminum cases are routinely distinguishable by vision, but to an experienced reloader, aluminum cases are also lighter than brass or nickel cases.
Jimbo
If everything is a case for gun control, then nothing is. - Charles C. W. Cooke

Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. - Theodore Roosevelt 1907 
Every immigrant who comes here should be required within five years to learn English or leave the country.  - Theodore Roosevelt 1918

The two most common elements in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity. - Harlan Ellison

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I am not sure about the former. - Albert Einstein
I fear the day that technology surpass our human interaction.  The world will have a generation of idiots. - Albert Einstein

The optomist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears that this is true! - James B. Cabell
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#25
I have been hesitant on recommending a reloading manual, but I have over twenty hard bound reloading manuals of various manufacturers, along with a few paper back manuals, and although I do refer to several of the manuals from time to time, if not all of them comparing various data, but in the end there are only a select few I truly use & rely on.

Probably everyone has their own favorite reloading manual, but the four I use most often are listed in the order of preference:
01.)  Sierra 1971 & volume V,
02.)  Hornady 10,
03.)  Lee #2,
04.)  Speer #10, and

05.)  Nonte Modern Handloading

Sierra is my preference & I used both the older 1971 edition about equal with the newer larger volume V edition, so I counted them as one.  I have two editions each of the other three reloading manuals, but the ones listed are those I always reached for first. 

The fifth manual listed:  Nonte Modern Handloading, by Maj. George C. Nonet, Jr., probably would not provide you anything of value at this date, but when I began reloading, it provide information not to be found in many reloading manuals, if any.  I felt like it deserved an 'Honorable Mention' because of it past history and wealth of service to myself.  Most notable it contained information on reloading 'shot shells' in .38 Special, .357 Mag, .44 Special, .44 Mag & .45 Colt cartridges for use against snakes.  Having an overabundance of Water Moccasins (Cotton Mouth Water Moccasins), Copperheads & Rattle Snakes where I live & hunt, I really appreciated that information, but there were other things in his manual I have used not found in other reloading manuals.  But if I am not mistaken this one is out of print today and that information is becoming dated, so unless you come across one at a thrift store in 'good condition' for fifty cents or a dollar, I would not recommend trying to locate & purchase one, but for me it was a good manual in its day & time. 

Of the other manuals I have, most just sit on their shelf & collect dust, but if needed they are nice to have as a research or comparison guide.  Actually they all just sit on the shelf and collect dust since pretty much all the loading data I use, is contained in my Lyman Reloader's Data Log, but I do still use them a little.  I do recommend you getting one of the Lyman Reloader's Data Log manuals to record your 'pet loads' in once you have began experimenting with reloading.  The Lyman Reloader's Data manual is very inexpensive at about five dollars & change, possibly a little more expensive in Canada. 

Happy reloading!
Jimbo
If everything is a case for gun control, then nothing is. - Charles C. W. Cooke

Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. - Theodore Roosevelt 1907 
Every immigrant who comes here should be required within five years to learn English or leave the country.  - Theodore Roosevelt 1918

The two most common elements in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity. - Harlan Ellison

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I am not sure about the former. - Albert Einstein
I fear the day that technology surpass our human interaction.  The world will have a generation of idiots. - Albert Einstein

The optomist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears that this is true! - James B. Cabell
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