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A brief trip report.
#1
I have just returned from Jolly old England where I spent eight nights.
First night I slept out after arriving late at the airport.
One night I spent sleeping out in Yorkshire.
One night I spent sleeping outside the airport before I flew back to the Far East.
The rest of the nights I stayed with friends.
However I had a problem.
Before I left Thailand I could not find my key to my storage unit.
And that meant I had no gear to use to sleep out. No kill em let God sort em out knife.
No black fang tactical sleeping bag. No viper sniper cooking pan.
However it was a challenge to me to survive without these essential items.
First at Withenshawe near the airport I bought a $13 sleeping bag, and a polyester woolly hat.
Plus some full size polythene trash sacks, and a newspaper.
The sleeping bag was too short, but then it was only $13.
I laid a trash sack down on the ground in trees near the airport, put the sleeping bag in the other trash sack, and after stuffing the sleeping bag with newspaper, spent a fairly comfortable night.
For my next night out I bought a $5 fleece without hood, a can of beer, and had a folding scout cup.
This night was more comfortable because I could sleep by a campfire.
In the morning I boiled water in the empty beer can and brewed coffee.
Back at the airport after a night out I discarded the odd socks I was wearing and my raggedy underpants, a shirt that had a collar beginning to wear, and dumped the cheap fleece, and left the sleeping bag.
I had lost the woolly hat some days before.
My method is increasing to have items to discard, especially clothes.
I had packed two shirts I was going to dump, and a few pairs of odd socks.
I entered the airport with enough time to have a shave and a wash, put on clean clothes, including a pair of trekking trousers I had bought, and was ready to fly – smelling of essence of the woods.

Tongue
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#2
(10-31-2018, 06:49 AM)Limey Pete Wrote: I have just returned from Jolly old England where I spent eight nights.
First night I slept out after arriving late at the airport.
One night I spent sleeping out in Yorkshire.
One night I spent sleeping outside the airport before I flew back to the Far East.
The rest of the nights I stayed with friends.
However I had a problem.
Before I left Thailand I could not find my key to my storage unit.
And that meant I had no gear to use to sleep out. No kill em let God sort em out knife.
No black fang tactical sleeping bag. No viper sniper cooking pan.
However it was a challenge to me to survive without these essential items.
First at Withenshawe near the airport I bought a $13 sleeping bag, and a polyester woolly hat.
Plus some full size polythene trash sacks, and a newspaper.
The sleeping bag was too short, but then it was only $13.
I laid a trash sack down on the ground in trees near the airport, put the sleeping bag in the other trash sack, and after stuffing the sleeping bag with newspaper, spent a fairly comfortable night.
For my next night out I bought a $5 fleece without hood, a can of beer, and had a folding scout cup.
This night was more comfortable because I could sleep by a campfire.
In the morning I boiled water in the empty beer can and brewed coffee.
Back at the airport after a night out I discarded the odd socks I was wearing and my raggedy underpants, a shirt that had a collar beginning to wear, and dumped the cheap fleece, and left the sleeping bag.
I had lost the woolly hat some days before.
My method is increasing to have items to discard, especially clothes.
I had packed two shirts I was going to dump, and a few pairs of odd socks.
I entered the airport with enough time to have a shave and a wash, put on clean clothes, including a pair of trekking trousers I had bought, and was ready to fly – smelling of essence of the woods.

Tongue

Thanks Limey! How long were you over for? 

As ALWAYS interesting......     Cool

Makes me think of that saying, 'the more it changes the more it stays the same'. I once saw that written (I think it was that) as 'reality is made up of circles but we see straight lines'. Took a moment or two to make sense of that.
Ratel

Tuum nosce hostem. Cuius testiculos habes, habeas cardia et cerebellum.
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#3
Eight nights Ratel.
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#4
Limey, You are a minimalist travelling in style. Less is more.
Addictive knife buying isn't guided by logic.

Its probably my age that makes people think I am an adult.

Tolerance is within a standard.

"Food is power. We use it to change behavior. Some
may call that bribery. We do not apologize."
 -Catherine Bertini, UN World Food Ex. Director, 1997

Proverbs 27:17
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#5
I once did a weight check of what I carried.
I was surprised to see a third of the weight was clothing.
Since then I never carry a spare pair of trousers.
I threw some combat trousers away once to save weight.
I have evolved a system of disposable clothing.
Disposable odd socks. Raggedy underpants. Worn our shirts, and purchasing cheap T shirts along the way to wear four days and dump.
In addition, clothing is bulky.
I could manage without my mess tins, but they are useful to carry crushable food, such as biscuits, bananas, eggs, and croissants
The bulkiest and heaviest item is the sleeping bag.
I have tried micro bags, but they are never warm enough.
Technology has reduced the weight of items for the pack.
For instance the size and weight of a flashlight has reduced considerably.
Anyone remember those EverReady flashlights, big, bulky and never much good, and then they failed after a short time.
Titanium cutlery? no, plastic is just as light and just as good.
I would not mind titanium mess tins but I have never seen any.
The less I have to carry, the less the weight of my pack I need.
Food is another weight that can build up too much, so unless I am unlikely to be able to buy food for more than two days, I limit the amount of food I carry.
Of course in a camp for a while, plenty of food can be purchased.
I once carried ten packet soups for a month!
When flying I am allowed a total of 26.45 British pounds.
I never have hold baggage.
That is a suitable weight to carry on a short trip walking.
I can carry 30 pounds without noticing the weight.
While riding freight trains I carried about 55 pounds, and after two weeks I did not notice the pack weight.
My one luxury is a book, however I would never carry a hardback - paperbacks every time.
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#6
(11-07-2018, 08:41 AM)Limey Pete Wrote: I can carry 30 pounds without noticing the weight.

Have you seen these people Pete, they carry very light packs Shy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaQqPbu1Fa0

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC18exdG...WisrnDXiZg

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQhqmV2...hzqJz4VFcw

https://outdoorselfreliance.com/ultralight-gear-list/
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#7
Ah a lot to study, and I am about to go to a bar, so I will answer later.
One comment I will make. I do like cowboy shirts
They have pop buttons, so buttons are not ripping off, and two chest pockets.
Problem is that most of them are polyester.
Cotton is a lot better.
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#8
Yes I looked through the first video, and was ready to be critical when I saw, for instance, titanium tent pegs?
But then at the end, the base weight was 12 pounds 5 ounces, so how can I object to that?
The second video where I found: Gear to Lighten your Load on a Budget!
I like the word budget because then I can dump items of gear with no great expense.
Two items I would not use are a sleeping pad, and water filtering system.
The water bottles I use are rarely more than a small half liter supermarket bottle, and when needing to carry more water I use collapsible water bottles such as a camel.
I see Tesco supermarkets are now selling aluminum cans of water.
I would buy them if I find them, because, I could heat one on a campfire, and later use the can to heat food.
I see the recommendation for Leukotape, and it looks as if it is worthwhile.
I always develop blisters if I have not been walking for awhile.
Well more tomorrow.
Any comments from members?
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#9
(11-08-2018, 08:11 AM)Limey Pete Wrote: Well more tomorrow.

Any comments from members?

I am waiting with bated breath Pete, I always value your practical insights Smile
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#10
Utilize what is around you. I am curious. What items do you regularly use today that were not readily available 10 or 20 years ago and what did you use then on a regular basis that you would consider a last choice today that was a must have then? Example: How has the absence of phone booths effected your urban strategies. Does a cell phone ease or burden your survival strategy? Is clean water more or less available than before? Is safety from other human beings a greater or lesser threat than before? Is modern clothing a plus or a minus viz. durability, heat retention, weather ability? What is the current cost of a good cup of Joe compared to previous experience and is t more or less readily available? Did you carry a knife then as opposed to know? How big? What  type?
Addictive knife buying isn't guided by logic.

Its probably my age that makes people think I am an adult.

Tolerance is within a standard.

"Food is power. We use it to change behavior. Some
may call that bribery. We do not apologize."
 -Catherine Bertini, UN World Food Ex. Director, 1997

Proverbs 27:17
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#11
As you age, as we all do, are you beginning to notice areas where your minimalist approach leaves you uncomfortable?

Do you envision a time when you will no longer choose to sleep in the shrubbery at the airport and instead, take a room with all the amenities?

DD
Some mornings it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps!


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#12
(11-08-2018, 12:27 PM)jbarrow Wrote: Utilize what is around you. I am curious. What items do you regularly use today that were not readily available 10 or 20 years ago and what did you use then on a regular basis that you would consider a last choice today that was a must have then? Example: How has the absence of phone booths effected your urban strategies. Does a cell phone ease or burden your survival strategy? Is clean water more or less available than before? Is safety from other human beings a greater or lesser threat than before? Is modern clothing a plus or a minus viz. durability, heat retention, weather ability? What is the current cost of a good cup of Joe compared to previous experience and is t more or less readily available? Did you carry a knife then as opposed to know? How big? What  type?

What items do you regularly use today that were not readily available 10 or 20 years ago.

Silk shirts.
A Photon flashlight.
A mobile phone.
My watch has a barometer, and shows the temperature, plus height above sea level, and has alarms.
Cheap disposable lighters. I have some with a flash light in the end.
Tiny camping gas burners.
Disposable small gas cylinders.
We used to have petrol stoves that we had to heat the burner first before they would work.
And what did you use then on a regular basis that you would consider a last choice today that was a must have then? 
A ground sheet. A tent. A map.
Example: How has the absence of phone booths effected your urban strategies. Not at all.
Does a cell phone ease or burden your survival strategy? 
A cell phone is a very useful tool in survival strategy.
For instance I found a plant that I wondered if I could eat. I looked the plant up on my mobile and found I could eat the plant.
I am planning to buy a mobile phone with GPS. That would be a useful tool
Is clean water more or less available than before? About the same really.
Is safety from other human beings a greater or lesser threat than before? 
No change I would say.
Is modern clothing a plus or a minus viz. durability, heat retention, weather ability? 
Modern clothing is a great plus, for instance: GorTex, a breathable waterproof.
Fleece, warm, but much lighter than wool.
Lightweight trekking trousers. I always buy Karrimor.
Surprisingly, I could never find a woolly hat that was big enough. They were all made just big enough to cover the top of the head, and then Thermarest started selling big watch caps . . .
What is the current cost of a good cup of Joe compared to previous experience and is it more or less readily available? 
In the USA, a good cup of coffee is everywhere, car parks, booths on the street; anywhere they can sell coffee really. It is expensive compared to what was, but much better
In the UK, they tend to put coffee shops in shopping centers, in the center of town.
In addition, the coffee is better. In the UK, all that was available at one time was Nescafe.
Did you carry a knife then as opposed to know? 
How big? What type?
I used to carry a sheath knife, and a multi bladed knife Sak type knife
Now I have a selection. I could carry a Thai farmer’s parang  type knife. A Kabar, or a Swiss Army Knife.
I usually just carry a Laguiole pocket knife, or a French Opinel.
Yes an interesting subject JBarrow. 
I am still waiting for a sleeping bag that weighs two pounds, and is as big as quart of Pepsi, that will keep me warm enough to sleep at two degrees below freezing.
  Tongue
Not impossible, Look at the Photon flash light in comparison to the old bulky EverReady flashlights.
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#13
(11-08-2018, 12:48 PM)ddennis2 Wrote: As you age, as we all do, are you beginning to notice areas where your minimalist approach leaves you uncomfortable?

Do you envision a time when you will no longer choose to sleep in the shrubbery at the airport and instead, take a room with all the amenities?

DD
If the weather is not too bad I am usually comfortable.
If I can have a campfire I am as happy as I would be inside.
I enjoy the  challenge of it all Dennis.
I feel sorry for those driving the streets and roads at night desperately looking for a room.
I revel in being the only one out on a freezing night, while everyone is inside huddled around their TV's
The world is mine. I am in an uncomfortable dark place that citizens avoid.
If I can do this, it is a great advantage to me. It is like having a devastating left hook.
Anyone with a devastating left hook fears no man. 
Problem is I do not have a devastating left hook- they usually hit me back.   Wink
Of course if I make it to a hundred years of age I might have to take a room Dennis.
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#14
About 16 years ago I was in Romania and went on an outing with a church youth group. I bought a sleeping bag there for about $35. It was very light and warm. I later gave it to my elder son. I once looked online and could not find anything like it.

I do have a sleeping bag that is only a pound and a half that is a true thirty degree bag. Much bigger than a quart but still pretty small. And I got it for under a hundred dollars. The latter is a Eureka Spero for those who are wondering - and it is no longer made although there may be a few left on the market. They also made one in "long" and at least one size for women that was several ounces heavier.
Theophilus
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#15
This looks like a good bag Theo.
Maybe I am not looking hard enough for a good sleeping bag.
I forgot to mention in my previous post replying to JBarrow that a good development is the bivi bag.
And the bivi bag raises the sleeping temperature three or four degrees.
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