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Outlaw Bug Out Bag What To Put In It?
#1
Outlaw Bug Out Bag









This discussion is for informational purposes only and does not convey mine or any other's true feelings about the subject matter. Just a fantasy discussion of an improbable future.







I recently saw a YouTube of someone discussing Joe Teti's bug out bag where he includes bolt cutters.



[url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgW4JMJ0Xuk"]https://www.youtube....h?v=bgW4JMJ0Xuk[/url]



He shows his bolt cutters at 5:30.









They did not like his bolt cutters! But that got me to thinking about real world survival. Exploring options above the law of ethics is good from a defensive and offensive standpoint. So my question is what would you consider carrying in your bug out bag in a fantasy lawless society bug out? This question is not about firearms, however other weapons can be discussed.







This is just a crazy discussion without any specific boundaries. I have one answer which came from John McCann, which I do include in my bag. The silcock key.



[url="http://www.survivalresources.com/Articles/BugOut_Water_Option.html"]http://www.survivalr...ter_Option.html[/url]



Any ideas? What about a fence climbing tool for chain link fences? Suggestions?
Message of Insight and Unity 

We go into the wilderness to fulfill our hearts and empty our minds of life's garbage.
The gear we leave behind and the challenges we encounter, 
Are methods we use to cleanse our spirits.
Of Survivalists and Bushcrafters, Primitive Technologists too, we are one.........

It is the wilderness within, we strive for first and always.
Not everyone can have a cabin in the mountains.
The thread that connects us, is fine like silk and strong as steel.
Together, the song of the wilderness is the song we sing!

"And can I say something else?"
Bushcrafting is "doing what you want to do." 
Survival is "doing what you have to do"
Primitive Technology is about all of the above........

By TNRR aka "Survival Sully"
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#2
Lock Picks could be useful.



If weight is no concern an electric drill can also be used to bypass a lock.



Bolt Cutters have uses beyond locks and can be useful for cutting wire and and some other metal items to make things. The main issue I see is the weight and bulk.



Locks, chains, zipties, etc. could be used to temporarily block entrances/exits if people are pursuing you.



Caltrops could also be used.



Maybe super glue can keep a door closed for a while.
"Why should I trade one tyrant 3,000 miles away for 3,000 tyrants one mile away. An elected legislature can trample a man's rights as easily as the king can." Benjamin Martin, The Patriot
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#3
Not in a bag but in my collection of jeep tools, I carry a crowbar, bunch of cold chisels, a 1 lb hammer, safety glasses, and knee pads.



A lot of stuff can be "fixed" with manual impact tools, imho. You could pretty much remove any door off its hinges if given some time - even if it is bolted into concrete or stone.
{  "Trust in Jesus but carry a sixgun in the bathroom."€  Phantom  }
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#4
I agree. I think area of operation should have its own tools. Most of us tend to think of wooded areas. What about "bugging in"? I live in a city. Those would require a totally different set of tools. There was a thread on this board that we made about this very thing several years ago. Bolt cutters, pry bars, lock picks, wood and metal saws, wire, soldering/welding/brazing gear, lineman's telephone, hammer, nails/screws, wood/drywall, and things to keep doors open/closed.... all very useful in that scenario.
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#5
Chisels. Wood and metal. Here's McCann's take on the crowbar. A hacksaw or at least a complete blade. You can accomplish a lot with just a hacksaw and some patience! All those prison escape movies are not fiction!

http://www.survivalresources.com/Article...rybar.html
Message of Insight and Unity 

We go into the wilderness to fulfill our hearts and empty our minds of life's garbage.
The gear we leave behind and the challenges we encounter, 
Are methods we use to cleanse our spirits.
Of Survivalists and Bushcrafters, Primitive Technologists too, we are one.........

It is the wilderness within, we strive for first and always.
Not everyone can have a cabin in the mountains.
The thread that connects us, is fine like silk and strong as steel.
Together, the song of the wilderness is the song we sing!

"And can I say something else?"
Bushcrafting is "doing what you want to do." 
Survival is "doing what you have to do"
Primitive Technology is about all of the above........

By TNRR aka "Survival Sully"
Reply
#6
For climbing chain link fences as a team, here is a tip from Bo Gritz's SPIKE training:



Each person has a 3-4' pipe, and they put them trough the links on each side at a corner, all the way to the top, making an improvised ladder.
"Why should I trade one tyrant 3,000 miles away for 3,000 tyrants one mile away. An elected legislature can trample a man's rights as easily as the king can." Benjamin Martin, The Patriot
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#7
I used to listen to Bo back in the shortwave days before the internet. Good and simple idea. Sticks would work but what if you are not near a corner? Still, I know a location where that will work!
Message of Insight and Unity 

We go into the wilderness to fulfill our hearts and empty our minds of life's garbage.
The gear we leave behind and the challenges we encounter, 
Are methods we use to cleanse our spirits.
Of Survivalists and Bushcrafters, Primitive Technologists too, we are one.........

It is the wilderness within, we strive for first and always.
Not everyone can have a cabin in the mountains.
The thread that connects us, is fine like silk and strong as steel.
Together, the song of the wilderness is the song we sing!

"And can I say something else?"
Bushcrafting is "doing what you want to do." 
Survival is "doing what you have to do"
Primitive Technology is about all of the above........

By TNRR aka "Survival Sully"
Reply
#8
Fencing pliers would work on most fences and be lighter and handier to boot. Plus they offer multiple functions other than just cutting.



Agree with the lockpicks if you know how to use them, especially with security pinned locks.



If the weight/size of bolt cutters was feasible, I'd rather have a 30" Halligan bar.
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. ---Robert Heinlein











Welcome to Tennessee, patron state of shooting stuff-Bob the Nailer
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#9
Sticks would work. I mentioned pipes mainly because that is what they used in the class.



The main issue I see is that typical dowels are inconsistent quality even if the store claims they are "hardwood," which is why I don't think typical dowels and brooksticks are suitable walking sticks.



In martial arts, two lightweight but strong materials people use for weapons are rattan (Eskrima sticks) and white waxwood, usually for Chinese staff weapons.



Strong PVC might also work, but that might be close to metal in weight.
"Why should I trade one tyrant 3,000 miles away for 3,000 tyrants one mile away. An elected legislature can trample a man's rights as easily as the king can." Benjamin Martin, The Patriot
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#10
Fence climbing



Why couldnt you use a carabiner and a loop of rope?



Hang the carabiner in the fence, stick foot in loop, pull self up. Add more biners and repeat as needed.



Kid
Live with honor, ride with truth.  Be friendly to others.  But always carry a gun on your side and a knife in your boot because there are those that do not feel the same as this.


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#11
Also flashlights, radio, and lots of batteries. It get dark in the woods after dark, and VERY dark in a building/city when there is no light (think power outage).



If there was some catastrophic event, what radio/s should you have to listen/communicate with? AM, FM, shortwave, CB, HAM, FRS, weather, something else? If you were trying to get rescued and communicate with someone (govt, military, large organization, etc), what would they be listening on?
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#12
[quote name='Kid Couteau' timestamp='1473183159' post='610382']

Fence climbing



Why couldnt you use a carabiner and a loop of rope?



Hang the carabiner in the fence, stick foot in loop, pull self up. Add more biners and repeat as needed.



Kid

[/quote]



Thats so simple, so ridiculous, so silly, so stupid, so just over my head, and so brilliant! Why didn't I think of that? [Image: cursing.gif] I love it when someone comes up with something I never would have on my on! Appreciate it!







I have a shortwave with single sideband to listen to Ham operators. When SHTF, the Hams might broadcast some local conditions. Local Hams have quite a local network of operators in many areas.
Message of Insight and Unity 

We go into the wilderness to fulfill our hearts and empty our minds of life's garbage.
The gear we leave behind and the challenges we encounter, 
Are methods we use to cleanse our spirits.
Of Survivalists and Bushcrafters, Primitive Technologists too, we are one.........

It is the wilderness within, we strive for first and always.
Not everyone can have a cabin in the mountains.
The thread that connects us, is fine like silk and strong as steel.
Together, the song of the wilderness is the song we sing!

"And can I say something else?"
Bushcrafting is "doing what you want to do." 
Survival is "doing what you have to do"
Primitive Technology is about all of the above........

By TNRR aka "Survival Sully"
Reply
#13
When designing a bug out/ get home bag/ wilderness support kit keep in mind the multiple use concept.

Caribiners and rope work because of their multiple applications.

Col Gritz idea even with escrima sticks limits secondary use, unless you employ something like trekking poles, each person would have two poles for steps in fence climbing, they can also be used as shelter supports with a tarp( or Big Agnes shelters sometimes eliminate supplying a tent pole in favor of using trekking poles), they can also be used as defensive weapons.

multiple application +lower weight = facility of travel.



Griz
Hopefully the S won't HTF and I pray every day that it won't. It would not be fun.



I have a high art..I wound with cruelty, all who wound me...Archillocus; 650 B.C.
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#14
[quote name='Benjamin Liu' timestamp='1473114375' post='610354']

Lock Picks could be useful.



If weight is no concern an electric drill can also be used to bypass a lock.



Bolt Cutters have uses beyond locks and can be useful for cutting wire and and some other metal items to make things. The main issue I see is the weight and bulk.



Locks, chains, zipties, etc. could be used to temporarily block entrances/exits if people are pursuing you.



Caltrops could also be used.



Maybe super glue can keep a door closed for a while.

[/quote]



Bump keys also useful.
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#15
I have a dollar store door stop in mine. With it, I can keep a door open or closed.
Improvise, Adapt, Overcome - Clint Eastwood, Heartbreak Ridge
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